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Volume 2 Issue 1, 2017, in progress



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  • RESEARCH LETTERS up

    • Benjamin R. K. Runkle, James R. Rigby, Michele L. Reba, Saseendran S. Anapalli, Joydeep Bhattacharjee, Ken W. Krauss, Lu Liang, Martin A. Locke, Kimberly A. Novick, Ruixiu Sui, Kosana Suvočarev and Paul M. White
      Delta-Flux: An Eddy Covariance Network for a Climate-Smart Lower Mississippi Basin
      Core Ideas
      • The Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB) is agriculturally important and ecologically unique.
      • The Delta-Flux network will coordinate the activities of 17 eddy covariance towers.
      • The network addresses the need for scaled C and water cycle observations.
      • The network aims to promote sustainable, climate-smart land management.
      • Delta-Flux is open to collaborators from strategic sites and relevant disciplines.
      doi:10.2134/ael2017.01.0003
      Agricultural & Environmental Letters 2017 2:170003
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    • E. W. Duncan, P. J. A. Kleinman, D. B. Beegle and C. A. Rotz
      Coupling Dairy Manure Storage with Injection to Improve Nitrogen Management: Whole-Farm Simulation Using the Integrated Farm System Model
      Core Ideas
      • Manure storage and injection strategies were simulated using the Integrated Farming Systems Model.
      • Strategies were verified using field data.
      • We compared manure storage in environmental and economic model outputs.
      • Introducing 6 mo of storage on a PA dairy farm decreased whole-farm NUE without manure injection.
      • Manure injection and 6 mo of storage gave the best combination of profit and environmental outcome.
      doi:10.2134/ael2016.12.0048
      Agricultural & Environmental Letters 2017 2:160048
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    • Zhongqi He, Hailin Zhang, Haile Tewolde and Mark Shankle
      Chemical Characterization of Cotton Plant Parts for Multiple Uses
      Core Ideas
      • Cotton plant parts can be used for multiple purposes depending on their compositions.
      • Cotton stems with less ash are better suited for lignocellulosic feedstock of bioenergy and bio-products.
      • Feed quality characteristics of cottonseed are comparable to those of forage crops.
      doi:10.2134/ael2016.11.0044
      Agricultural & Environmental Letters 2017 2:110044
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    • Marty R. Schmer, Rachael M. Brown, Virginia L. Jin, Robert B. Mitchell and Daren D. Redfearn
      Corn Residue Use by Livestock in the United States
      Core Ideas
      • USDA-ERS surveyed 2250 producers from 19 states on corn residue grazing and mechanical harvests in 2010.
      • Approximately 4.06 million ha was grazed by 11.7 million head of livestock.
      • Approximately 0.81 million ha of corn residue was mechanically harvested in 2010.
      • Corn residue is a significant resource for integrated crop–livestock systems in the western Corn Belt.
      doi:10.2134/ael2016.10.0043
      Agricultural & Environmental Letters 2017 2:160043
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  • COMMENTARY up

    • T. W. Shaddox, C. D. Ryan and K. Tang
      Reference Ranges: A Novel Interpretation of Turfgrass Nutrient Values
      Core Ideas
      • Plant tissue tests are interpreted using yield as a metric.
      • Turfgrass value is commonly measured using quality.
      • Reference ranges identify “normal” nutrient ranges by using turf quality as a metric.
      • Reference ranges should be considered as an alternative tissue test interpretation.
      doi:10.2134/ael2016.12.0046
      Agricultural & Environmental Letters 2017 2:160046
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  • RESEARCH LETTERS up

    • W. C. Kreuser, J. R. Young and M. D. Richardson
      Modeling Performance of Plant Growth Regulators
      Core Ideas
      • Growing degree day models continue to predict plant growth regulator performance in turfgrass.
      • Data collection should occur until the growth response has dissipated, not based on predefined intervals.
      • Including a dampening coefficient in the sinewave models allows the clipping yield effect to decay with time.
      • Adding a decay coefficient allows sinewave models to fit datasets where a rebound growth phase did not occur.
      doi:10.2134/ael2017.01.0001
      Agricultural & Environmental Letters 2017 2:170001
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