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Abstract

 

This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 102 No. 4, p. 1194-1200
     
    Received: Feb 4, 2010


    * Corresponding author(s): sqli@ms.iswc.ac.cn
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doi:10.2134/agronj2010.0053

Effects of Elevated Ammonia Concentration and Nitrogen Status on the Growth and Yield of Winter Wheat

  1. Xiaoli Chena,
  2. Xiaolong Renb,
  3. Pute Wuc,
  4. Xining Zhaoc,
  5. Jing Lid and
  6. Shiqing Li *e
  1. a National Engineering Research Center for Water-Saving and Irrigation at Yangling, Institute of Soil Erosion and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Ministry of Water Resources, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China
    b Research Center of Dryland Farming in Arid and Semiarid Areas, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China
    c National Engineering Research Center for Water-Saving and Irrigation at Yangling, Institute of Soil Erosion and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Ministry of Water Resources, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China
    d College of Resources and Environment Sciences, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100
    e State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Farming, Institute of Soil Erosion and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Ministry of Water Resources, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China. X. Chen and X. Ren contributed equally to this work

Abstract

Elevated atmospheric NH3 may affect productivity of crops in part by altering N assimilation, and the effect may be responsible for the N status of the plant. To investigate this possibility, measurements of plant height, leaf area per plant, net photosynthesis rate (Pn ), plant biomass production, shoot/root (S/R) ratio, grain yield and its components were used to examine the effects of elevated NH3 concentration in combination with N status on growth and yield in pot-grown winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) using open-top chambers. After 2 month of NH3 injection, elevated NH3 significantly increased plant height, leaf area per plant, shoot biomass production (total biomass), and S/R ratio in the N-deprived plants in both years, but the corresponding values in the N-sufficient plants were reduced. The Pn values were increased with NH3 enhancement both in the presence and absence of N in the potting soil in each experimental year, but the increment of Pn in N-deprived plants was two times higher than that of the N-sufficient plants in both years. At harvest, grain yields of N-deprived winter wheat exposed to elevated levels of NH3 were increased by 21% and 23% than that of N-deprived winter wheat exposed to 0 levels of NH3, while grain yields of N-sufficient winter wheat exposed to elevated levels of NH3 were decreased by 27% and 23% than that of N-sufficient winter wheat exposed to 0 levels of NH3 in 2007 and 2008, respectively.

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Copyright © 2010. American Society of AgronomyCopyright © 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy