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Agronomy Journal Abstract - Soil Fertility & Crop Nutrition

Complementing Late-Season Nitrogen Fertilization of Cool-Season Turfgrass Putting Greens with Trinexapac-ethyl

 

This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 105 No. 6, p. 1507-1514
     
    Received: Jan 21, 2013
    Published: August 2, 2013


    * Corresponding author(s): mjs38@psu.edu
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doi:10.2134/agronj2012.0443
  1. Chase M. Rogan and
  2. Maxim J. Schlossberg *
  1. Center for Turfgrass Science, Dep. of Plant Science, 116 ASI Bldg., Penn State Univ., University Park, PA 16802

Abstract

Considering the vast number of golf course putting greens (PGs) comprised of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) and annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) polystands; greater understanding of seasonal growth response to fall applications of growth regulators and/or N fertilizers is needed. The objective was to determine how timing of fall trinexapac-ethyl (TE; 4-[Cyclopropyl-a-hydroxymethylene]-3,5-dioxo-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid ethyl ester) plant growth regulator and/or N application rate influence(s) PG N assimilation, removal, and spring canopy density. Field studies were initiated on a mixed creeping bentgrass + annual bluegrass PG in September 2009 or 2010. Foliar applications of TE at 0, 0.044+0.044, or 0.088 kg ha–1 were made in combination with soluble N at 30 or 60 kg ha–1. Treatment initiations, recurring every 10±1 d and centered on 15 October (30-yr average date of first frost), represent the four treatment timings. Fall N rate directly influenced PG density but did not interact with TE. Compared to the 30 kg ha–1 N rate, significantly lesser proportions of the 60 kg N rate were removed by mowing. Fall and early-spring PG growth decreased linearly with later N application dates, yet application timing significantly interacted with TE. Late fall TE treatment reduced early-spring shoot growth as much as 20%.

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