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This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 69 No. 5, p. 825-828
     
    Received: Sept 16, 1976
    Published: Sept, 1977


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doi:10.2134/agronj1977.00021962006900050024x

Effect of P, K, and Lime on Growth, Composition, and 32P Absorption by Merion Kentucky Bluegrass1

  1. T. L. Watschke,
  2. D. V. Waddington,
  3. D. J. Wehner and
  4. C. L. Forth2

Abstract

Abstract

Information is needed concerning the effects of different soil fertility levels on the activity of turfgrass roots in that part of the soil profile sampled for routine soil tests. In Pennsylvania, a sampling depth of 5 to 7.5 cm is suggested for established turf. A study was conducted on ‘Merion’ Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) to determine relationships among lime, phosphorus, and potassium applications; soil test results; foliar growth and elemental analysis; and root activity as determined by 32P uptake from three soil depths. In the field, soil pH values were 5.8 and 7.0, P ranged from 13 to 137 ppm, and K ranged from 0.14 to 0.43 meq./100g. Liming increased the Ca content in clippings from 0.35 to 0.42%. Phosphorus treatments increased P from 0.32 to 0.44%, and K was increased from 2.00 to 2.45% by K fertilization. Clipping yield was increased by P treatments. Sod plugs from the field were used in the greenhouse to determine root activity. Agar discs containing 32P were placed at a depth of 1.3, 3.8, or 6.4 cm, and clippings were assayed for 32P after 20 and 33 days. Shallow placement of 32P resulted in more absorption. A soil P × depth interaction was found for 32p absorption. A significant positive correlation between soil P and 32P absorption was obtained for the 1.3 cm depth, whereas a nonsignificant correlation was found for the 6.4 cm placement. Results indicated that P enhanced rooting, and the magnitude of absorption from the 1.3-cm depth exemplified the need for P near the soil surface for optimum turf establishment.

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