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Agronomy Journal Abstract -

Fescue Yield Response to Sewage Sludge Compost Amendments1

 

This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 72 No. 1, p. 79-84
     
    Received: Feb 14, 1979


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doi:10.2134/agronj1980.00021962007200010016x
  1. L. J. Sikora,
  2. C. F. Tester,
  3. J. M. Taylor and
  4. J. F. Parr2

Abstract

Abstract

The agronomic benefits of applying sewage sludge compost to land have yet to be defined. The study reported is part of a series designed to assess the benefits. It deals specifically with fescue yield response to sewage sludge compost and fertilizer. An Evesboro loamy sand (Typic Quartzipsamments) and a Fauquier silt loam (Ultic Hapudalfs) soil were amended with four rates of sewage sludge compost (0 to 6% equal to 0 to 134.4 metric ton/ha, dry weight), plus an additional lime control and two rates of N, P or N plus P (0 and 195 kg/ha) in a factorial Beenhouse study. —Kentucky 31― tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) was grown and harvested at 40, 76, 120, and 167 days and the clippings were dried and weighed. A significantly greater grass yield was obtained from the compost amended Evesboro than the compost amended Fauquier which contained a vermiculite clay fraction. Yields were linearly related to compost amendment for both soils. Yields were significantly increased by the addition of N, P, or N plus P to compost amended soils. The largest yield increase was obtained by the addition of N plus P. The mineralization of compost organic N was the limiting factor in grass yield. Regression models were derived from the data using compost and days as independent variables for each soil, N, and P combination. In most cases, a quadratic term for compost amendment was necessary for explaining the variation in yield. Regression model equations based on cumulative yield data contained similar terms for each soil, N, and P combination except for the Fauquier soil with N and P added for which no model was obtained.

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