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This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 74 No. 6, p. 978-983
     
    Received: Nov 9, 1981
    Published: Nov, 1982


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doi:10.2134/agronj1982.00021962007400060012x

Nitrogen Utilization Efficiency by Drip Irrigated Celery Receiving Preplant or Water Applied N Fertilizer1

  1. A. Feigin,
  2. J. Letey and
  3. W. M. Jarrell2

Abstract

Abstract

Optimizing N-fertilization is important from both economical and environmental quality points of view. An experiment was conducted to evaluate N utilization efficiency by celery (Apium graveolens L.) in response to type, amount, and method of N-fertilizer application under drip irrigation. This study was conducted on San Emigdio sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed (calcareous), thermic Typic Xerofluvent). Fertilizer types included ammonium sulfate (AS) and a slow release (SR) fertilizer applied to the soil before planting and urea ammonium nitrate (UAN) applied with the irrigation water during the growing season. Ammonium sulfate and SR were applied at 314 kg Nlha and UAN was applied at rates of 168, 336, and 504 kg N/ ha. Two irrigation variables were 400 and 500 mm of water application. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) was grown to determine the effect of residual soil N following the celery crop. Nitrogen uptake increased with increasing rates of UAN application with relatively little effects of irrigation treatment. Lower N uptake resulted from 500 as compared to the 400 mm irrigation treatment for the soil applied SR and AS fertilizers. There was less N uptake for SR and AS treatments than the UAN treatment of comparable N application. Nitrogen uptake results are consistent with N distributions in the soil which indicated greater leaching of SR and AS fertilizer below the root zone than UAN and higher leaching with higher irrigation treatment. Growth and N uptake by the barley crop were consistent with measured residual N for the various treatments applied to celery.

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