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This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 82 No. 3, p. 549-555
     

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doi:10.2134/agronj1990.00021962008200030023x

Localized Dry Spots as Caused by Hydrophobic Sands on Bentgrass Greens

  1. K. A. Tucker *,
  2. K. J. Karnok*,
  3. D. E. Radcliffe,
  4. G. Landry,
  5. R. W. Roncadori and
  6. K. H. Tan
  1. E xtension Agronomy Dep.
    D ep. Plant Pathology, Univ. Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
    D ep. Agronomy

Abstract

Abstract

Construction of creeping bentgrass (Agrosfis palustris Huds.) golf greens with topsoil mixtures that contain 90% or more sand has led to the appearance of irregularly shaped areas of wilted or dead turfgrass known as localized dry spots (LDS). Objectives were to determine by means of a survey the association between management practices and the severity of LDS, and to compare the chemical and physical properties of LDS and adjacent healthy areas (HA) of greens. Turf managers from ten golf courses and the University of Georgia Turfgrass Plots completed a 34-question survey pertaining to management practices used on their respective greens. Four of the golf courses and the University Turf Plots were selected as sampling sites for soil from both LDS and HA. Soid was analyzed for moisture content, and particle size, as well as hydrophobicity via the water droplet penetration time, and contact angle methods. Soil organic matter, soluble salts, pH, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, B, and NO3, were also determined. In addition, soil from each area was viewed with a scanning electron microscope. Dry spots occurred at all locations surveyed and no correlation was observed between management practices and the severity of LDS. No differences in soil chemical properties were found between LDS and HA, but water droplet penetration time and contact angle were greater in LDS compared to HA. This hydrophobic condition was confined to the top 50 mm of soil in the dry spot samples and coincided with the presence of an organic coating on sand grains that was observed by scanning electron microscopy.

Research. supported by state and Hatch funds allocated to the Georga Agnc. Exp. Stn. and by grant funds from the Georga Golf Course Superintendents Association.

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