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Agronomy Journal Abstract -

Incubation of Injected Liquid Beef Manure: Effect of Time and Manure Rate

 

This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 84 No. 2, p. 224-228
     
    Received: Aug 13, 1990


    * Corresponding author(s):
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doi:10.2134/agronj1992.00021962008400020020x
  1. M.A. Schmitt ,
  2. J.E. Sawyer and
  3. R.G. Hoeft
  1. D ep. of Soil Science, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, Univ. of Minnesota, Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108-6024
    G rowmark Inc., 1701 Towanda Ave., Bloomington, IL 61702
    D ep. of Agronomy, 1102 S. Goodwin Ave., Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801

Abstract

Abstract

An investigation was conducted to determine if N compounds and other chemical parameters that could cause poor corn (Zea mays L.) growth were associated with injected liquid beef manure. Liquid beef manure was injected into a Derinda silt loam soil (fine, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludalf) and incubated in two laboratory experiments. Experiment 1 consisted of two application rates, 18 and 36 mL kg−1 soil, injected into 25 g of moist soil and incubated for 44 d. Experiment 2 consisted of five manure application rates (0,29,58, 116, and 232 mL kg−1 soil, equivalent to 2.3, 4.6, 9.2, and 18.4 dry Mg ha−1) layered between 50 g of soil and incubated for 4 wk Rstes simulated the range of manure concentrations in band applications of 37200 L manure ha−1. There was a linear trend of increasing NHcN concentrations as manure application rates increased. A transitory period of lowered soil redox potential (Eh) and elevated pH occurred for 2 wk after application, especially for the highest manure rate. Nitrite-N accumulated with all rates of manure, but the accumulation was transitory with low manure rates. At 116 and 232 mL kg−1, high levels of NO2- N were present for 3 and 4 wk, respectively. Conditions potentially toxic to plants were generated initially by reducing conditions (as indicated by low Eh) and free NH3, (due to high pH and high concentrations of water extractable and exchangeable NH4-N), and subsequently, by accumulation of NO4-N.

Contribution of the Dep. of Agronomy and the Agric. Exp. Stn., Univ. of Illinois.

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