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Agronomy Journal Abstract - RICE

Nitrogen Dynamics and Fertilizer Use Efficiency in Rice following Straw Incorporation and Winter Flooding

 

This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 93 No. 6, p. 1346-1354
     

    * Corresponding author(s): cvankessel@ucdavis.edu
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doi:10.2134/agronj2001.1346
  1. Alison J. Eaglea,
  2. Jeffrey A. Birda,
  3. James E. Hillb,
  4. William R. Horwatha and
  5. Chris van Kessel *b
  1. a Dep. of Land, Air, and Water Resources, Univ. of California, Davis, CA 95616
    b Dep. of Agron. and Range Sci

Abstract

Incorporation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) straw, when compared with burning, affects soil N supply by increasing N and C inputs. This study determined the effects of long-term alternative rice straw management and winter flooding on seasonal crop uptake of N, fertilizer N use efficiency (FNUE), and crop N uptake from 15 N-labeled straw. Microplots were established on two sites in California, Maxwell and Biggs, by applying 15 N-labeled fertilizer during Year 4 of a long-term rice straw management study. At the end of the year, 15 N-labeled straw was applied to assess crop uptake of straw N in the following season. Fertilizer use efficiency by 15 N dilution (FUE– 15 N) over the growing season at Maxwell and at final harvest at Biggs was significantly higher when straw was burned rather than incorporated. Fertilizer use efficiency by N difference was significantly greater than FUE– 15 N, suggesting an apparent added N interaction (ANI). Straw management did not significantly affect the uptake of residual fertilizer 15 N or of straw 15 N in the subsequent year. Winter flooding had no significant effect on measured parameters. Data indicate a decrease in FNUE with a concomitant and more significant increase in the plant available soil N following the change in straw management from burning to incorporation. Belowground 15 N pools appear to be a larger source of N for the following crop than aboveground residue.

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Copyright © 2001. American Society of AgronomyPublished in Agron. J.93:1346–1354.