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This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 95 No. 4, p. 1082-1087
     
    Received: May 22, 2002


    * Corresponding author(s): sneller.5@osu.edu
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doi:10.2134/agronj2003.1082

Soybean Yield Potential and Phenology in the Ultra-Short-Season Production System

  1. Tetsuaki Ishibashia,
  2. Clay H. Sneller *b and
  3. Grover Shannonc
  1. a Dep. of Crop, Soil, and Environ. Sci., Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701
    b Dep. of Hortic. and Crop Sci., The Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH 44691
    c Dep. of Agron., Univ. of Missouri Delta Cent., Portageville, MO 63873

Abstract

Summer drought is a major yield limitation for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in the Midsouth. Yield may be improved by matching crop development to periods of sufficient soil moisture, requiring a crop that matures by late July. Our objective was to evaluate early maturing lines for their ability to avoid drought and yield potential in the Midsouth. We evaluated maturity group (MG) 00 through I lines for yield and other traits in 2000 (222 lines) and 2001 (152 lines), planting irrigated plots in late April with final stands of >800000 plants ha−1 Sixty-one lines selected from the 2000 trials were also grown in 2001. Many lines matured in <78 d from emergence and would avoid mid-July or later droughts. In different environments, the average yield of this maturity class ranged from 1310 to 2712 kg ha−1 while the maximum yield of individual lines ranged from 2342 to 3594 kg ha−1 Other lines matured in 78 and 91 d and would avoid August droughts. In different environments, the average yield of this maturity class ranged from 2630 to 4128 kg ha−1 while the maximum yield of individual lines ranged from 3144 to 4676 kg ha−1 The potential of this ultra-short-season production system to produce a viable crop in less than 78 d may have significant implications as water supplies become more limited and expensive in the Midsouth and many other regions of the world.

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Copyright © 2003. American Society of AgronomyPublished in Agron. J.95:1082–1087.