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This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 96 No. 6, p. 1761-1764
     
    Received: Mar 22, 2004


    * Corresponding author(s): pjwiatrak@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
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doi:10.2134/agronj2004.1761

Tillage and Residual Nitrogen Impact on Wheat Forage

  1. P. J. Wiatrak *a,
  2. D. L. Wrighta and
  3. J. J. Maroisb
  1. a Dep. of Agronomy, North Florida Res. and Educ. Center, Univ. of Florida, 155 Research Rd., Quincy, FL 32351
    b Dep. of Plant Pathology, North Florida Res. and Educ. Center, Univ. of Florida, 155 Research Rd., Quincy, FL 32351

Abstract

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) forage yield and quality can be affected by management of the previous crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate two tillage systems [no-till (NT) and conventional (CT)] and residual response to four N rates (0, 67, 134, and 202 kg ha−1) applied to the previous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) crop. The experiment was conducted on a Dothan sandy loam (fine, loamy siliceous, thermic Plinthic Kandiudults) in 1995–1996 and 1996–1997. Greater wheat dry matter yields were obtained from CT than NT in 1995–1996 (6.3 and 5.4 Mg ha−1, respectively), while tillage did not influence yields in 1996–1997 (7.5 and 8.0 Mg ha−1 for CT and NT, respectively). Wheat yields were not influenced by N application to the previous cotton crop. The in vitro organic matter digestion (IVOMD) was not influenced by tillage or N application to the previous cotton crop. With increasing N application to a previous cotton crop, neutral detergent fiber (NDFt) and neutral detergent ash-free (NDFaf) increased in wheat forage under CT and decreased in NT. Nitrogen concentration of wheat increased with N application to the previous crop. Concentration of P was greater from CT than NT in 1995–1996, while tillage did not influence P concentration in 1996–1997 growing season. Increasing N application rates to the previous crop decreased NDFt and NDFaf in wheat grown in NT and increased N concentration in dry matter of wheat grown in both tillage systems. Generally, NT is a viable option for growing wheat forage following cotton.

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