About Us | Help Videos | Contact Us | Subscriptions
 

Abstract

 

This article in AJ

  1. Vol. 97 No. 4, p. 1153-1157
     
    Received: Mar 26, 2004


    * Corresponding author(s): hende112@msu.edu
 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions
Request Permissions
 Share

doi:10.2134/agronj2004.0083

A NEW APPARATUS TO SIMULATE ATHLETIC FIELD TRAFFIC

  1. J. J. Henderson *a,
  2. J. L. Lanovazb,
  3. J. N. Rogersa,
  4. J. C. Sorochanc and
  5. J. T. Vaninia
  1. a Dep. of Crop and Soil Sci., Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI 48824-1325
    b Dep. of Mechanical Eng., Human Mobility Res. Cent., Queen's Univ., Kingston, ON, Canada
    c Dep. of Plant Sci., The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996

Abstract

Realistic traffic simulation is crucial to the validity of athletic field research. Previously developed athletic field traffic simulators contain studded drums that turn at different speeds, creating shear forces at the playing surface. The Cady Traffic Simulator (CTS) (a modified walk-behind core cultivation unit) was developed at Michigan State University in 2000. The objective of this study was to compare the magnitude and direction of the forces produced by two traffic simulators: the Brinkman Traffic Simulator (BTS), a pull-behind unit, and the CTS. Both simulators were operated over an in-ground force plate, which measured the forces in three directions: front to back, side to side, and vertical. The CTS produced a higher compressive stress and net shear stress when operated in either direction than the BTS. The average peak compressive stress produced by the feet of the CTS when operated in the forward direction was approximately 30 times higher than the combined compressive stresses of both BTS drums. The average peak net shear stress produced by the feet of the CTS when operated in the forward direction was approximately 15 times higher than the combined net shear stresses of both BTS drums. Operating in the reverse direction, the average peak compressive stress produced by the feet of the CTS was greater than five times the compressive stresses of both BTS drums combined. The average peak net shear stress produced by the feet of the CTS was approximately four times higher than the combined net shear stresses of both BTS drums.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © 2005. American Society of AgronomyAmerican Society of Agronomy