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This article in ATS

  1. Vol. 5 No. 1
     
    Accepted: Dec 7, 2007


    * Corresponding author(s): jnemitz@purdue.edu
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doi:10.1094/ATS-2008-0118-01-RS

Sod Production Utilizing an Improved Seeded Bermudagrass Cultivar

  1. McCalla Johna,
  2. Richardson Michael *b,
  3. Karcher Douglasc,
  4. Landreth Joshd and
  5. Patton Aarone
  1. a Department of Horticulture, 316 Plant Sciences Building, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 72701
    b Department of Horticulture, 316 Plant Sciences Building, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 72701
    c Department of Horticulture, 316 Plant Sciences Building, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 72701
    d Department of Horticulture, 316 Plant Sciences Building, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 72701
    e Department of Horticulture, 316 Plant Sciences Building, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 72701

Abstract

Improved, seeded bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) cultivars have the potential to be used for sod production, but there has been no research to determine appropriate methods for this application. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of sod netting and the growth regulator, trinexapac-ethyl (TE), on the time required to harvest sod using a seeded bermudagrass. The experimental design of this study was a strip-plot with sod netting being the whole plot treatment and TE treatments (0.059 lb ai/acre every 2 weeks and 0.118 lb ai/acre every 4 weeks) as the sub-plot treatment. 'Riviera' bermudagrass (C. dactylon var. dactylon) was seeded at a rate of 43.5 lb/acre during the first week of June in 2005 and 2006. A commercially-available sod netting product was randomly applied to half of the whole plot area in each replicate immediately after seeding and TE treatments were initiated at 6 weeks after planting (WAP). A strip of sod containing twelve 18- × 30-inch pads was harvested from each sub-plot at 10, 12, 14, and 16 WAP. At each harvest date, the following parameters were measured: (i) harvestable sod as the percentage of pads that were able to be handled without damage, and (ii) sod tensile strength was measured on a subsample of 5 harvested pads. Netting allowed 100% of the sod to be harvested as early as 10 WAP, while a complete harvest was never obtained with the non-netted sod up to 16 WAP. The growth regulator, TE, had a positive effect on both percentage harvested sod and tensile strength of the sod, suggesting it can be used to hasten the harvest of bermudagrass sod when established from seed.

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