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Book: Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America

 

This chapter in PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL TURFGRASS RESEARCH CONFERENCE

  1.  p. 145-148
     
    Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference

    James B. Beard (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-248-1

     

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doi:10.2135/1974.proc3rdintlturfgrass.c17

Influence of Aeration and Genotype upon Root Growth of Creeping Bentgrass at Supra-Optimal Temperatures1

  1. Kent W. Kurtz and
  2. W. R. Kneebone

Abstract

Abstract

Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris Huds.) is widely used on specialized turfgrass areas such as golf putting greens. When grown where summer temperatures are high for long durations, the resistance of bentgrass to other stressesis lowered and turfgrass quality is reduced. The practices of frequent soil cultivation by mechanical means have been utilized to enhance bentgrass vigor. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of aeration on root development of selected bentgrass clones grown under high temperatures.

The effect of aeration and temperature on rooting ability of nine creeping bentgrass clones was measured by placing cut stolons in bottles of tap water at 36, 38, and 40 C. Rooting over a 2-week period was evaluated in terms of root numbers per stolon node, number of stolon nodes rooted, and total number of roots grown with and without aeration. Bottles were aerated by bubbling air from tubes attached to a small aquarium pump. Differences between bentgrasses were significant only at 36 C and there was no significant clone by aeration interaction. Aeration significantly increased rooting at all temperatures with the most pronounced differences being at 40 C. These data emphasize the advantage of adequate aeration of creeping bentgrass grown under high temperatures.

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Copyright © 1980. Copyright © 1980 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, and International Turfgrass Society, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA