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Book: Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America

 

This chapter in PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL TURFGRASS RESEARCH CONFERENCE

  1.  p. 155-163
     
    Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference

    James B. Beard (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-248-1

     

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doi:10.2135/1974.proc3rdintlturfgrass.c19

Anatomical and Physiological Effects of Air Pollutants on Turtqrassea1

  1. V. B. Youngner and
  2. F. J. Nudge

Abstract

Abstract

Air pollution, found in most urban areas, may be a significant factor in turfgrass culture. A series of studies were conducted at the University of California, Riverside, to determine the effects of air pollutants, primarily ozone and peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN) on various turfgrass species and cultivars.

Distinct differences in susceptibility were noted among species and among cultivars within a species. Anatomical observations showed pronounced internal leaf injury following a single 3-hour exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone or 50 ppb of PAN. Field observations on cultivars of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) following exposure to natural air pollution correlated well with laboratory observations.

Repeated exposure to low concentrations of ozone reduced tillering and total shoot growth of some species, but did not affect others. Nonstructural carbohydrate levels were also reduced in some cases. No acute toxicity symptoms were noted on any of the plants in this study. Apparent photosynthesis of a susceptible and of a tolerant Cynodon hybrid was not reduced in either cultivar during exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone for 2 hours. Thus, differences in stomatal response to ozone could not explain differences in susceptibility. Because genotypes differ in their susceptibility to air pollution, breeding more highly resistant strains should be possible.

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Copyright © 1980. Copyright © 1980 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, and International Turfgrass Society, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA