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Book: Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America

 

This chapter in PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL TURFGRASS RESEARCH CONFERENCE

  1.  p. 165-171
     
    Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference

    James B. Beard (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-248-1

     
    Published: 1980


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doi:10.2135/1974.proc3rdintlturfgrass.c20

Tolerance of Turfgrass Cultivars to Salt1

  1. Keith Ahti,
  2. Adly Moustafa and
  3. Howard Kaerwer

Abstract

Abstract

Salt is used on northern U.S. and Canadian highways to reduce ice hazards. Much of this salt washes, splashes, or sprays onto highway shoulders, killing the grass cover. Turfgrasses are also grown extensively in areas where soils are saline or where saltladen water is used for irrigation.

This study determined the response of turfgrasses to toxic levels of NaCl applied as aqueous solutions. Plants were established in deep, open-bottomed flats. Salt solutions were applied by subirrigation through a compounded sand-clay loam soil mix.

‘Fults’ weeping alkaligrass (Puccinellia distans (L.) Parl.) was highly salt tolerant. Of the grasses tested, the fine-leaved fescues (Festuca spp.) had the broadest range of tolerance. ‘Dawson’ and ‘Golfrood’ red fescue [Festuca rubra (L.) var, trichophylla Gaud.)] were most tolerant of high salt concentrations. The Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis (L.) cultivars evaluated did not show an extensive range of salt tolerance. Of the cultivars tested ‘Nugget’ was the most tolerant.

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Copyright © 1980. Copyright © 1980 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, and International Turfgrass Society, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA