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Book: Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America

 

This chapter in PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL TURFGRASS RESEARCH CONFERENCE

  1.  p. 205-214
     
    Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference

    James B. Beard (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-248-1

     

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doi:10.2135/1974.proc3rdintlturfgrass.c24

Bentgrass Growth in Relation to Soil Properties of Typic Hapludalfs Soil Variously Modified for a Golf Green1

  1. R. E. Schmidt

Abstract

Abstract

This study was initiated to obtain information on the influence of soil physical aspects in relation to turf growth. A ‘Penncross’ creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris Huds.) experimental golf putting green was constructed of soil modified with different amounts of coarse river sand and a graded expanded shale. Two compaction levels and two irrigation regimes were imposed on the test site for 9 years. During this time, air porosity, infiltration rates, and shoot growth were measured. Air porosity reduction from 1966 to 1974 was less than the decrease in water infiltration, which was greater for highly modified than for slightly modified mixes. Heavy irrigation and compaction reduced air porosity, but only compaction significantly reduced water infiltration. Although air porosity and infiltration rates were greater with increased amounts of modifying materials, both air porosity and water infiltration were greater in corresponding mixes containing the more uniform expanded shale. After 6 years of heavy compaction and high irrigation, no mix had more than 4.5 cm/hour infiltration.

Yields from the first clipping in the spring were greater on the heavily compacted than lightly compacted plots. The reverse was true during the summer, possibly because of foliar injury imparted by the compactor.

Wilting occurred more frequently and clipping yields were generally less for soil mixes containing the greatest amount of modifying materials. Removal of excess surface water with adequate surface drainage may be more beneficial for bentgrass growth than excess internal drainage.

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Copyright © 1980. Copyright © 1980 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, and International Turfgrass Society, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA