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Book: Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America

 

This chapter in PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL TURFGRASS RESEARCH CONFERENCE

  1.  p. 343-350
     
    Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference

    James B. Beard (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-248-1

     
    Published: 1980


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doi:10.2135/1974.proc3rdintlturfgrass.c40

Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization and Cutting Height on the Shoot Growth, Nutrient Removal, and Turfgrass Composition of an Initially Perennial Ryegrass Dominant Sports Turf1

  1. W. A. Adams

Abstract

Abstract

A field experiment was designed to extend observations made in sand culture on the interdependence between cutting height and fertilizer level on the shoot growth of turfgrasses and to examine the ratios of major nutrients removed in clippings over a 22-week experimental period. The factorial experiment included two mowing frequencies, three heights of cut, and three levels of N fertilization.

Clipping yields ranged between 1,670 kg/ha and 6,260 kg/ha. While there was a general trend for cutting height and N fertilizer to be interdependent in their effect on shoot growth, the results were not as clear as those obtained in sand culture. The treatments substantially changed turfgrass composition and different growth responses to the treatment variables by different sward constituents may have affected the shoot growth results.

Percent cover of annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) at the end of the experiment had increased significantly with increases in N and decreases in cutting height. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was not affected by N application, but percent cover was significantly greater at the highest height of cut than at the lowest. Colonial bentgrass (Agrostis tenuis Sibth.) showed no significant variation with cutting height, but percent cover was significantly less at the highest N application.

The ratio of major nutrients removed in clippings showed little variation with treatment and was not related to the mean ratio in applied fertilizer. The total N removed in clippings increased by 260 %, from 0 to 312 kg/ha of applied N. However, the ratios of N:P and N:K in the clippings changed by only 9 and 2 %, respectively.

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Copyright © 1980. Copyright © 1980 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, and International Turfgrass Society, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA