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Book: Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America

 

This chapter in PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL TURFGRASS RESEARCH CONFERENCE

  1.  p. 45-52
     
    Proceedings of the Third International Turfgrass Research Conference

    James B. Beard (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-248-1

     
    Published: 1980


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doi:10.2135/1974.proc3rdintlturfgrass.c6

The Principles of Blending Kentucky Bluegrass Cultivars for Disease Resistance1

  1. J. M. Vargas and
  2. A. J. Turgeon

Abstract

Abstract

Turfgrass blends, which include two or more cultivars of the same species, are frequently recommended over single-cultivar plantings to provide improved disease resistance and turfgrass quality. The purpose of this study was to determine whether specific blends of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) exhibited improved quality and better resistance to melting-out (Helminthosporium vagans), stripe smut ( Ustilago striijormis), and Fusarium blight (Fusarium roseum and F. tricinotum) diseases, compared to monostands of their component cultivars.

A 1972 planting of Kentucky bluegrass cultivar monostands and blends on Flanagan silt loam (Aquic Arquidoll) was monitored for seasonal quality and disease for 5 years. Results indicate that the melting-out resistance of blends is usually intermediate between that of the component cultivars. The inoculum production by a melting-out-susceptible cultivar usually reduces the generalized resistance of a normally resistant cultivar in a blend. A similar trend was observed for Fusarium blight in blends. The severity of stripe smut was usually, but not always, reduced in polystands in which a cultivar with specific resistance was included. Generally, turfgrass quality of blends was either intermediate between that of the component cultivar monostands, or not significantly different from the components.

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Copyright © 1980. Copyright © 1980 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, and International Turfgrass Society, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA