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Book: Sulfur: A Missing Link between Soils, Crops, and Nutrition
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America

 

This chapter in SULFUR: A MISSING LINK BETWEEN SOILS, CROPS, AND NUTRITION

  1.  p. 117-142
    Agronomy Monographs 50.
    Sulfur: A Missing Link between Soils, Crops, and Nutrition

    Joseph Jez (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-186-6

     

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doi:10.2134/agronmonogr50.c8

Sulfur Management for Soybean Production

  1. Kiyoko Hitsuda,
  2. Kazunobu Toriyama,
  3. Guntur V. Subbarao and
  4. Osamu Ito
  1. Japan Development Service Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan
    Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences, Ibaraki, Japan

Abstract

Sulfur is an essential nutrient for the growth and productivity of high-quality soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. While genetic approaches have been proposed to improve the nutritional value of soybean through the increase of the contents of sulfur-containing amino acids in seed, the negative relationships between yield level and quality traits have remained a problem. Although the distribution and assimilation of sulfur in soybean tissues have been studied to improve the effective use of remobilized sulfur from the vegetative plant parts to the seeds, measures for practical use have yet to be developed. Field management requires the assessment of the soil sulfur fertility status. However, because of the heterogeneity of sulfur concentrations within the soil horizons, this remains a challenging option. The sulfur concentration of the uppermost mature leaves of soybean at the flowering stage has been commonly used for diagnosing the sulfur status in plant. This approach is limited because latent sulfur deficiency and seed quality cannot be evaluated adequately. Recently, analysis of sulfur concentration in seed has been proposed, as it became possible to determine latent sulfur deficiency in relation to the seed quality, reflected by the concentration of sulfur-containing amino acids in seed proteins. To determine the need for sulfur fertilization in preparation for the subsequent soybean cropping, we suggest that sulfur levels in seed is a good indicator of the sulfur fertility status in the field.

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Copyright © 2008. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, 5585 Guilford Road, Madison, WI 53711-5801, USA. Sulfur: A Missing Link between Soils, Crops, and Nutrition. Agronomy Monograph 50.