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Book: Tall Fescue for the Twenty-first Century
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America

 

This chapter in TALL FESCUE FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

  1.  p. 11-30
    agronomy monographs 53.
    Tall Fescue for the Twenty-first Century

    H.A. Fribourg, D.B. Hannaway and C.P. West (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-185-9

     
    Published: 2009


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doi:10.2134/agronmonogr53.c2

Systematics and Morphology

  1. Kelly D. Craven,
  2. Keith Clay and
  3. Christopher L. Schardl
  1. The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, Oklahoma
    Dep. of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington
    Dep. of Plant Pathology, University of Kentucky, Lexington

Abstract

Abstract

Hexaploid tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh. = Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort., formerly Festuca arundinacea Schreb. var. arundinacea] is an agronomically vital member of the grass family that has been characterized based on morphological characteristics, interfertility relationships, and, more recently, genetic criteria such as gene sequences. Efforts to improve tall fescue for forage or turf and to gain insight into processes of grass evolution hinge on an accurate depiction of the interrelationships that exist between this species and other Lolium and Festuca grasses. The evolution of hexaploid tall fescue, and a majority of grasses, has involved interspecific hybridization that obscures species boundaries but, more importantly, serves as a rapid means of combining distinct genomes into novel progeny with enhanced evolutionary potential. We discuss here the systematics of the Festuca–Lolium complex within the context of such processes and highlight the dynamic and often confounding evolutionary history that characterizes tall fescue and its relatives.

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Copyright © 2009. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, 5585 Guilford Road, Madison, WI 53711-5801, USA. Tall Fescue for the Twenty-first Century. H.A. Fribourg, D.B. Hannaway, and C.P. West (ed.)