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Book: Introduction to Crop Protection
Published by: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America

 

 

This chapter in INTRODUCTION TO CROP PROTECTION

  1.  p. i-xv
     
    Introduction to Crop Protection

    W. B. Ennis (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-569-7

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doi:10.2135/1979.introtocropprotection.frontmatter

Front Matter

Foreword

The accelerated pace of research, augmented by sophisticated instrumentation and techniques, and new opinions, imparts o crop science a rapidly changing character as new discoveries replace and/or add to former concepts. New findings force us to reevaluate and often reconstruct the foundations on which crop science rests.

The Teaching Improvement Committee of the Crop Science Society of America identified the urgent need for developing contemporary reading materials aimed at upper level undergraduate college students. A current presentation of the dynamic state of modern crop science is a formidable challenge worthy of the best talents of eminent research and teaching personnel in the field. This task necessitates assembling the most capable representatives of the various disciplines within crop science and bringing them together in teams of writers to prepare a series of publications based on contemporary research. The Crop Science Society of America and the American Society of Agronomy have undertaken this large assignment by selecting more than 100 specialists who will contribute to making the Foundations of Modem Crop Science books a reality.

The authors and editors of this series believe that the new approach taken in organizing subject matter and relating it to current discoveries and new principles will stimulate the interest of students. A single book cannot fulfill the different and changing requirements that must be met in various programs and curricula within our junior and senior colleges. Conversely, the needs of the students and the prerogatives of teachers can be satisfied by well-written, well-illustrated, and relatively inexpensive books planned to encompass those areas that are vital and central to understanding the content, state, and direction of modem crop science. The Foundations for Modem Crop Science books represent the translation of this central theme into volumes that form an integrated series but can be used alone or in any combination desired in support of specific courses.

The most important thing about any book is its authorship. Each book and/or chapter in this series on Foundations for Modem Crop Science is written by a recognized specialist in his discipline. The Crop Science Society of America and the American Society of Agronomy join the Foundations for Modem Crop Science Book Writing Project Committee in extending special acknowledgment and gratitude to the many writers of these books. The series is a tribute to the devotion of many important contributors who, recognizing the need, approach this major project with enthusiasm.

A. W. Burger, chairman

C.D. Dybing

A.A. Hanson

L. H. Smith

M. Stelly

Preface

The term, “Crop Protection,” has become of increasing significance with the advent of improved and complex technology for protecting crops against different kinds of pests. This book intends to acquaint undergraduate students with the principles and the complexities of integrating all the technologies required to provide a total crop protection.

The writing of this book involved the efforts of over 50 scientists representing a large number of disciplines concerned with one or more important aspects of protecting crops against pests. An attempt is made to bring together some of the current thinking pertaining to the integration of various approaches and technologies into comprehensive crop protection systems whose aims are not only to reduce losses caused by pests, but also to preserve a quality environment. Modern communications, transportation, effective and safe pesticides, computers, biocontrol agents, and other technologies allow us to devise total crop protection programs not considered attainable a few years ago.

The information presented, together with the suggested readings, will introduce the reader to emerging techniques, concepts, and components of crop protection systems. The contributors to this book are eminent scientists in their fields of specialization. Thus the student has an opportunity to capitalize on the expert knowledge of specialists.

Special thanks is due a Steering Committee who provided invaluable assistance for this book. This committee was a multidisciplinary group that helped develop the format and content for the book, select the authors, and review the adequacy of each chapter. In addition, internationally known scientists helped coordinate different parts of the book. The coordinators worked with the authors of the various chapters in writing detailed outlines of the subject matter and reviewing the manuscripts before they were submitted to the editor. I cannot overemphasize the inestimable contributions of the Steering Committee and the substantial assistance of the coordinators throughout the writing of this book.

Grateful acknowledgment is made of the outstanding contributions of the many authors who cooperated so effectively in writing the different chapters. The manner in which so many scientists joined together in this undertaking is a successful example of multidisciplinary cooperation. Such cooperation will be required increasingly to cope with the emerging and future complexities of devising and implementing integrated crop protection methodology for pests of all kinds.

The assistance of Mrs. Betti Patterson, Secretary, Agricultural Research Center, Ft. Lauderdale, in retyping, editing, and organizing the different parts of the book is acknowledged with appreciation.

W. B. Ennis, Jr.

Contributors

P. A. Andrilenas, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250. (Agricultural Economist)

L. Apple, North Carolina State University, Agricultural Experiment Station, Raleigh, NC 27607. (Plant Pathologist and Assistant Director of Research)

Keith C. Barrons, Agricultural consultant, 142 Westbay Cove, Holmes Beach, FL 33510, formerly Dow Chemical Company, Ag-Organics Department, Midland, MI (Weed Scientist) (Retired)

F. R. Bradbury, Department of Management Science and Technology Studies, University of Stirling, Scotland. (Professor and Head of Department)

J. R. Bradley, Jr., Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607. (Entomologist—Pest Management)

Orvin C. Burnside, Department of Agronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583. (Weed Scientist)

G. A. Carlson, Department of Economics and Business, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607. (Agricultural Economist)

J. M. Chandler, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Southern Weed Science Laboratory, Stoneville, MS 38776. (Weed Scientist)

L. L. Danielson, 4500 Creemore Drive, Charlotte, NC 28213, formerly. Agricultural Environmental Quality Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (Weed Scientist and Institute Chairman) (Retired)

David E. Davis, 777 Pichacho Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93108, formerly Department of Zoology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (Vertebrate Ecologist and Professor Emeritus of Zoology)

William F. Durham, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, Raleigh, NC 27607. (Toxicologist)

B. Y. Endo, Plant Protection Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Nematologist and Institute Cho1rman)

W. B. Ennis, Jr., University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Research Center, 3205 S. W. 70th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314. (Editor)

Julius Feldmesser, Plant Protection Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Nematologist)

Maurice R. Gebhardt, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65201. (Agricultural Engineer)

J. M. Good, Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Room 5535 South Building, Washington, DC 20250. (Nematologist and Director, Pest Management Programs)

J. H. Graham, present address, Waterman-Loomis Company, 2000 Century Plaza, Suite 110, Columbia, MD 21044, formerly Plant Physiology Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (Plant Pathologist)

M. B. Green, Research and Development Department, Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd., Runcorn, Cheshire, England. (Chemist and Head of Department)

C. H. Hanson, 766 Barlow Drive, Lake Heritage, Gettysburg, PA 17325, formerly National Program Staff, Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD. (Plant Breeder) (Retired)

T. J. Henneberry, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Phoenix, AZ 85025. (Entomologist and Director of Laboratory)

G. A. Hood, Denver Wildlife Research Center, Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Denver, CO 80225. (Wildlife Biologist)

C. M. Ignoffo, Biological Control of Insects Research, Science and Education Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture, P.O. Box A, Columbia, MO 65205. (Entomologist—Biological Control)

Allan R. Isensee, Agriculture Environmental Quality Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Plant Physiologist)

Donald D. Kaufman, Agriculture Environmental Quality Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Soil Microbiologist)

W. Klassen, National Program Staff, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Entomologist—Pest Management)

Dayton L. Klingman, Weed Science Laboratory, Agricultural Environmental Quality Institute, U.S. Department of Agriculture, BARC-West, Room 231, Bldg. 001, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Weed Scientist and Chief of Laboratory)

Thor Kommedahl, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55455. (Plant Pathologist)

Ray R. Kriner, Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903. (Entomologist—Pest Management)

Erwin L. LeClerg, 14620 Deerhurst Terrace, Silver Spring, MD 20906, formerly U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (Biometrician and Plant Pathologist) (Retired)

Robert McCabe, Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706. (Ecologist and Chairman of Department)

R. L. Metcalf, Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801. (Entomologist and Chemist)

Paul R. Miller, 207 South Pebble Beach Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33570, formerly U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Plant Pathologist) (Retired)

J. R. Plimmer, Organic Chemical Synthesis Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Chemist and Laboratory Chien

N. T. Powell, Department of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607. (Plant Pathologist and Nematologist)

R. L. Rabb, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607. (Entomologist—Pest Management)

R. V. Rebois, Nematology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Nematologist and Laboratory Chief)

R. L. Ridgway, National Program Staff, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705. (Entomologist)

R. I. Sailer, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. (Entomologist—Biological Control)

J. F. Schafer, Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, W A 99163. (Plant Pathologist and Chairman of Department)

F. W. Slife, Department of Agronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801. (Weed Scientist)

D. B. Smith, Biological Control of Insects Research, Science and Education Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture, P.O. Box A, Columbia, MO 65201. (Entomologist—Biological Control)

E. H. Smith, Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850. (Entomologist and Chairman of Department)

Joseph F. Spears, Plant Protection and Quarantine Programs, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Hyattsville, MD 20782. (Plant Pest Regulation)

N. H. Starler, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250. (Economist)

R. E. Stinner, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27687. (Population Ecologist)

C. P. Stone, Denver Wildlife Research Center, Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Denver, CO 80225. (Wildlife Biologist)

C. R. Swanson, Brush and Weed Control Investigations, Grassland Soil and Water Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Temple, TX 76501. (Weed Scientist and Research Leader)

A. L. Taylor, 2620 S. W. 14 Drive, Gainesville, FL 32608, formerly Bureau of Nematology, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville, FL 32611. (Nematologist) (Retired)

G. D. Thomas, Biological Control of Insects Research, Science and Education Administration, P.O. Box A, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Columbia, MO 65201. (Entomologist—Biological Control)

S. G. Turnipseed, Department of Entomology, Edisto Station, P.O. Box 247, Clemson University, Blackville, SC 29817. (Entomologist—Pest Management)

F. H. Tschirley, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823. (Ecologist and Head of Department)

William M. Upholt, 525 East Indian Spring Drive, Silver Spring, MD 20901, formerly Water and Hazardous Materials, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (Pesticide Regulation and Senior Science Advisor) (Retired)

A. F. Wiese, Texas Agriculture Experiment Station, Texas A&M University, Bushland, TX 79012. (Weed Scientist)

Carol E. Windels, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55455. (Plant Pathologist)

Homer R. Wolfe, Field Studies Section, Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Wenatchee, W A 98801. (Entomologist and Section Chief).

Steering Committee

DR. J. M. GOOD

Nematologist and Director, Pest Management Programs, Extension Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250

DR. J. L. HILTON

Weed Scientist and Chairman, Agricultural Environmental Quality Institute, United States Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705

DR. W. KLASSEN

Entomologist and Staff Scientist for Pest Management, United States Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705

MR. HOWARD LEHNERT

Agronomist and Extension Information Specialist, Extension Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250

DR. PAUL R. MILLER

Plant Pathologist, (retired), United States Department of Agriculture, 207 S. Pebble Bch. Blvd., Sun City Center, FL 33570

DR. J. R. PLIMMER

Chemist, and Laboratory Chief, Organic Chemical Synthesis Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705

DR. W. C. SHAW

Weed Scientist and Staff Scientist for Weed Science and Agricultural Chemicals Technology, United States Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705

 

Footnotes


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