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Book: Tomography of Soil-Water-Root Processes
Published by: Soil Science Society of America, American Society of Agronomy, and Crop Science Society of America

 

 

This chapter in TOMOGRAPHY OF SOIL-WATER-ROOT PROCESSES

  1.  p. i-xvii
    sssa special publication 36.
    Tomography of Soil-Water-Root Processes

    S. H. Anderson and J. W. Hopmans (ed.)

    ISBN: 978-0-89118-931-2

    OPEN ACCESS
     
    Published: 1994


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doi:10.2136/sssaspecpub36.frontmatter

Front Matter

Foreword

During their March meeting in 1992, the SSSA Executive Committee approved the publication of the papers presented in a special symposium entitled “Tomography for Measurement of Soil Physical Properties and Processes” held during the 1992 Annual Meeting. This SSSA Special Publication presents the outcomes from the symposium. Tomography is a very powerful tool for soil science research. Although tomography has not been widely used for soil science investigations, there are many potential applications of the technology. The papers in this Special Publication clearly document the power of tomography in soil science research and the wide range of applications for this new tool. The SSSA Executive Committee commends the symposium organizers and the editors of the Special Publication for highlighting the usefulness of tomography to soil scientists.

DARRELL W. NELSON, President

Soil Science Society of America

Preface

The evaluation of dynamic, small-scale transport processes has alluded scientists due to a lack of adequate non-destructive measurement techniques. Water and solute transport models have proliferated faster than scientists' ability to take scale-appropriate soil-water measurements, thereby making testing of these models difficult. Non-invasive measurement techniques developed in the field of medicine have been applied during the past 10 years to the study of water and solute transport in soils. These techniques include x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As a result, CT and MRI have allowed soil scientists to non-destructively quantify soil and plant root properties in two or three dimensions at a spatial resolution of approximately 1 mm. Further development of these techniques have made available some very specialized equipment that make non-destructive measurements possible at a spatial resolution equal to the soil pore geometry (10-500 micrometer).

As a result of the rapid advance in CT and MRI techniques and their successful application in soil and plant science, the Soil Physics Division of the Soil Science Society of America sponsored a special symposium during the 1992 annual meeting of the ASA in Minneapolis. The symposium was entitled “Tomography for Measurement of Soil Physical Properties and Processes”. The objective of the symposium was to provide a forum to highlight current efforts for quantifying soil and plant properties and processes using gamma-ray and x-ray computed tomopgraphy and magnetic resonance imaging technologies. Invited and volunteered papers were presented on measurement of water and solute transport processes utilizing CT techniques. Although some researchers have also applied MRI to study these processes, the contributions of this symposium presented MRI as a tool to study plant roots and their associated water uptake patterns.

We thank all participants and authors of papers for their efforts in making the symposium a success.

STEPHEN H. ANDERSON

University of Missouri

Columbia, Missorui

JAN HOPMANS

University of California

Davis, California

Contributors

Jeffrey E. Anders, RocketDyne, Division of Rockwell International, Canoga Park, CA 91309-7922.

Stephen H. Anderson, Associate Professor of Soil Physics, Department of Soil and Atmospheric Sciencs, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

L. A. G. Aylmore, Professor of Soil Science, Department of Soil Science, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009.

G. O. Brown, Associate Professor, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

D. K. Cassel, Professor of Soil Science, Department of Soil Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7619.

Milena Cislerova, Senior Research Worker, Czech Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, 16629 Prague, Czech Republic.

S. R. Clinkscales, Graduate Student, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

E. de Jong, Professor of Soil Science, Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W0, Canada.

Clark J. Gantzer, Associate Professor of Soil Science, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

J. E. Gazin, Graduate Student, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Mike C. J. Grevens, Soil Scientist, Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W0, Canada.

David J. Heinze, Graduate Research Assistant; currently Assistant Engineer, McLaren/Hart Environmental Engineering, Springfield, MO 65804.

F. Hopkins, Vice President of Research and Development, Scientific Measurement Systems, Inc., Austin, TX 78758.

Jan W. Hopmans, Associate Professor of Hydrologic Science, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

G. A. Johnson, Professor of Radiology and Physics, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710.

K. W. Jones, Senior Physicist, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000.

I-Wen Y. Liu, Ph.D. Candidate, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

Janet S. MacFall, Assistant Research Professor, School of The Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27706.

C. Murphy, Advisory Scientist, Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC 29808.

D. R. Nielsen, Professor of Soil and Water Science, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

R. Lee Peyton, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Lyle Prunty, Professor of Soil Science, Department of Soil Science, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105-5638.

E. L. Ramseur, Horticulture Specialist, Trugreen-Chemlawn, College Park, GA 30337.

P. Spanne, Physicist, Department of Applied Science; currently Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000.

J. S. Steude, Director of Scanning Services, Scientific Measurement Systems, Inc., Austin, TX 78758.

M. L. Stone, Associate Professor, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74708.

E. W. Tollner, Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department, Driftmier Engineering Center, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Tomas Vogel, Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Charles University, 12843 Prague, Czech Republic.

Lawrence J. Waldron, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

Hong Wang, Research Associate, The Pennsylvania State Univesity, University Park, PA 16802.

Sam T. S. Wong, Staff Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720.

John W. Wigger, Graduate Student (Engineer), Groundwater Management Section, Amoco Corporation, Tulsa, OK 74145.

 

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