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This article in CFTM

  1. Vol. 3 No. 1
     
    Received: June 02, 2016
    Accepted: Dec 19, 2016
    Published: February 16, 2017


    * Corresponding author(s): ejalderman@ksu.edu
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doi:10.2134/cftm2016.06.0044

Buffalograss Divot Recovery as Affected by Nitrogen Source and Rate

  1. Evan J. Alderman *a,
  2. Jared A. Hoyleb,
  3. Steven J. Keeleyc and
  4. Jack D. Fryd
  1. a Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Horticulture and Natural Resources, Kansas State University, 2021 Throckmorton Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506
    b Assistant Professor, Department of Horticulture and Natural Resources, Kansas State University, 2021 Throckmorton Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506
    c Professor, Department of Horticulture and Natural Resources, Kansas State University, 2021 Throckmorton Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506
    d Professor, Department of Horticulture and Natural Resources, Kansas State University, 2021 Throckmorton Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506
Core Ideas:
  • Buffalograss treated with urea to provide 1 lb N/1,000 ft2 achieved 50% divot recovery 6.3 days faster than untreated turf.
  • Polymer-coated urea applications did not improve divot recovery rates compared with the 0 lb N treatment.
  • Under limited irrigation situations and with minimal fertilization, buffalograss exhibits improved divot recovery and, thus, playability in low input turfgrass management systems.

Abstract

Divots occur when a golfer’s club impacts the surface and removes turf. No published research has been conducted to explore the influence of nitrogen (N) fertility on divot recovery in buffalograss [Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm]. The objective of this study was to determine if nitrogen source and rate influence divot recovery in buffalograss. Research trials were initiated in 2014 at the Rocky Ford Research Center (RF) in Manhattan, KS and Council Grove Country Club (CG) in Council Grove, KS. Three divots were created per plot using a modified edger. Urea (46–0-0) served as the quick-release N source, and polymer-coated urea (PCU) (43–0-0) was the controlled release N source; each was applied to provide 0, 1, 2, and 3 lb N/1,000 ft2/yr. Buffalograss treated with urea to provide 1 lb N/1,000 ft2 achieved 50% divot recovery 6.3 d faster than untreated turf; however, the 3 lb N/1,000 ft2 rate did not enhance divot recovery in comparison. Polymer-coated urea applied the day of divoting did not improve divot recovery rates compared to the 0 lb N treatment. Acceptable divot recovery is possible in buffalograss with a quick-release N source and N fertility levels as low as 1 lb N/1,000 ft2/yr.

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