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This article in CFTM

  1. Vol. 3 No. 1
     
    Received: Dec 12, 2016
    Accepted: Feb 22, 2017
    Published: April 28, 2017


    * Corresponding author(s): lindsey.233@osu.edu
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doi:10.2134/cftm2016.12.0081

Low Soil Phosphorus and Potassium Limit Soybean Grain Yield in Ohio

  1. Aaron P. Brookera,
  2. Laura E. Lindsey *b,
  3. Steven W. Culmanc,
  4. Sakthi K. Subburayalud and
  5. Peter R. Thomisone
  1. a Former Graduate Research Associate, Dep. of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH 43210
    b Assistant Professor, Dep. of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH 43210
    c School of Environment and Natural Resources, Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH 44691
    d Research Scientist, School of Environment and Natural Resources, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH 43210
    e Professor, Dep. of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH 43210
Core Ideas:
  • Twenty-one percent of the soil samples were within the build-up range for P.
  • Twenty-three percent of the soil samples were within the build-up range for K.
  • Soybean yield decreased when soil test P and K were within the build-up range.

Abstract

A soil survey was conducted in Ohio with the following objectives: (i) to assess the status of soil fertility; (ii) to examine soybean grain yield in areas with fertility levels in the build-up range, where soil test levels were less than the critical level (CL); the maintenance range, where soil test levels were between the CL and maintenance limit (ML); and the drawdown range, where soil test levels were greater than the ML; and (iii) to determine if the soil test and yield data collected support the state-established fertility recommendations. Soil sampling was conducted from 2013 through 2015 resulting in 593 total samples. Soil P, K, Ca, Mg; pH; organic matter (OM); and cation exchange capacity (CEC) were measured. Soybean grain yield was also collected from the sampling areas. Twenty-one and 23% of the soil samples collected were within the build-up range for P and K, respectively. On average, grain yield was 7 bu/acre lower in sampling areas associated with soil P levels in the build-up range, whereas an average grain yield reduction of 4 bu/acre was associated with K levels in the build-up range. In sampling areas, there was no difference in grain yield associated with soil P and K levels within the maintenance range and drawdown range. Our data suggest that soil test levels within the build-up range were associated with lower soybean grain yields.

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