About Us | Help Videos | Contact Us | Subscriptions
 

Abstract

 

This article in CM

  1. Vol. 5 No. 1
     

    * Corresponding author(s): dholshou@vt.edu
 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions
 Share

doi:10.1094/CM-2006-0417-01-RS

Uniform Stand and Narrow Rows are Needed for Higher Double-crop Soybean Yield

  1. David L. Holshouser *a,
  2. Robert D. Grissob and
  3. Robert M. Pitmanc
  1. a Tidewater Agricultural Research & Extension Center, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Suffolk 23434
    b Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg 24060
    c Eastern Virginia Agricultural Research & Extension Center, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Warsaw 22572

Abstract

Double-crop soybean producers do not always realize a yield benefit when they convert from a 15-inch planter to a 7.5-inch grain drill. Poor seed singulation with drills was suspected to limit narrow-row yield response. Experiments were conducted to determine if a precision drill with 7.5-inch row spacing and accurate soybean seed singulation would improve stand uniformity and/or increase yield over a standard grain drill with poor seed singulation or a vacuum-meter planter with 15-inch row spacing and accurate soybean seed singulation in a double-cropped soybean system. The effects of planter speed on stand uniformity and yield were also investigated. Stand uniformity with the precision drill was equal to the vacuum-meter planter and better than the standard drill. Soybean yield with the standard drill was equal to the vacuum-meter planter in three of four years and less than the vacuum-meter planter in one year. Soybean yields were greater when planted with the precision drill than when planted with the vacuum-meter planter in 2 of 3 years, and averaged 10% over three years of study. Planting speeds of 5 or 7 mph did not affect stand uniformity or yield.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © 2006. © 2006 Plant Management Network.