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Abstract

 

This article in CS

  1. Vol. 28 No. 5, p. 835-838
     
    Received: Mar 28, 1987


    * Corresponding author(s):
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doi:10.2135/cropsci1988.0011183X002800050023x

Responses of Glasshouse Grown Cotton to Irrigation with Carbon Dioxide-Saturated Water

  1. J. R. Mauney  and
  2. D. L. Hendrix
  1. USDA-ARS Western Cotton Res. Lab., 4135 E. Broadway Rd., Phoenix, AZ 85040

Abstract

Abstract

Experiments were conducted to test the suitability of using irrigation water as a carrier for CO2 to enhance growth and productivity of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Potted plants (‘DPL 61’) were irrigated daily with CO2-saturated water in a greenhouse in Phoenix, AZ. Growth, productivity, and physiological responses of these plants were compared to those irrigated with deionized water. All plants were fertilized twice weekly with a modified Hoagland's solution. Yield as measured by boll load at maturity was increased 70 and 53% in two sets of experiments. Carbon dioxide exchange rate (CER) was increased 38%. Leaf chlorophyll content and starch content were also increased. None of the carbon in lint samples was derived from the CO2 in the irrigation water. Leaf Zn and Mn were deficient in the control plants but were sufficient in the plants watered with CO2-saturated water. The CO2-saturated irrigation water increased uptake of Zn and Mn, which supported a more robust photosynthetic apparatus in the treated compared to the control plants. The greater photosynthetic activity during boll loading resulted in a significant increase in yield of the treated plants.

Joint contribution of USDA-ARS and Univ. of Arizona.

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