About Us | Help Videos | Contact Us | Subscriptions
 

Abstract

 

This article in CS

  1. Vol. 32 No. 1, p. 67-72
     
    Received: Jan 28, 1991


    * Corresponding author(s):
 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions
Request Permissions
 Share

doi:10.2135/cropsci1992.0011183X003200010015x

Inheritance of Resistance to Soybean Mosaic Virus in ‘Buffalo’ and HLS Soybean

  1. G. R. Bowers Jr. ,
  2. E. H. Paschal II,
  3. R. L. Bernard and
  4. R. M. Goodman
  1. T exas A&M Univ. Agric. Res. and Ext. Ctr., Rt. 7, Box 999, Beaumont, TX 77713
    A sgrow Seed Co., Oxford, IN 47971
    D ep. of Agronomy, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801

Abstract

Abstract

Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is a major disease problem in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.J production in several regions in the world. The disease is controllable with plant resistance. This study was undertaken to elucidate the genetics of SMV resistance in the cultivar Buffalo and in the breeding line HLS so they can be used effectively in breeding programs. Buffalo and HLS were crossed to the SMV-susceptible cultivar Jupiter and with each other. Portions of the F1, F2, and F2:3 populations from each cross were inoculated with one of seven SMV strains (G1∓G7). Virus inoculations were done in the field or greenhouse using an air-brush technique. Chi-square analysis of the segregation ratios of populations from the Buffalo × Jupiter cross show that Buffalo's resistance to SMV strains Gl to G7 is under monogenie control, and exhibited dominance under the conditions of this study. Results of the HLS × Jupiter cross show that resistance in HLS to SMV strains G5, G6, and G7 is also conditioned by a single dominant gene. When inoculated with SMV strain G5, G6, or G7, populations of F2 plants from the cross Buffalo × HLS segregated in the ratio of 15 resistant to 1 susceptible. This result, supported by the F2:3 segregation data, suggests that the SMV resistance genes in Buffalo and HLS are located at different loci.

Part of a thesis submitted by the senior author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree at the Univ. of Illinois. This research was supported in part by research contracts cm/ta-c-73-19 and TA/C-194 from the U.S. Agency for International Development through the Univ. of Illinois International Soybean Program (INTSOY).

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © .