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This article in CS

  1. Vol. 32 No. 2, p. 328-331
     
    Received: Mar 3, 1991
    Published: Mar, 1992


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doi:10.2135/cropsci1992.0011183X003200020009x

Heritability of Oat Mosaic Resistance

  1. David V. Uhr  and
  2. Paul J. Murphy
  1. Dep. of Crop Science, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7629

Abstract

Abstract

Detailed knowledge about the heritability of oat mosaic (OM) resistance would help breeders to more effectively plan strategies for incorporating OM resistance into new cultivars. The objective of this study was to estimate the heritability of resistance to OM in winter oat (Avena sativa L.) using variance component analysis, parent-offspring regression, parent-offspring correlation, and realized heritability. One hundred random F2:3 lines and their F2:4 progeny from a double-cross population (NC 82-45/NC 82-79/2/NC 84-67/NC 84-68) were evaluated in six replicates of hill plots for 2 yr at two North Carolina locations. Soil type at the Piedmont Research Station was a Hiwassee clay loam (clayey, kaolinitic, thermic, Rhodic Kanhapludult) and at the Central Crops Research Station was a Cecil sandy clay loam (clayey, kaolinitic, thermic, Typic Kanhapludult). Resistance was estimated visually with a leaf mosaic symptom scale during the spring vegetative growth stage (GS 31). Broad-sense heritability estimates based on entry means were 0.75 for F2:3 lines and 0.84 for F2:4 lines. The parent-offspring regression coefficient was 0.80 and parent-offspring correlation was 0.73. Realized heritability was 0.99, based on entry means from four environments. Heritabilities in a second population (Brooks/NC 81-341/2/NC 83-123/Madison) evaluated at one location over 2 yr were smaller. The results suggested that considerable progress may be expected from visual selection for OM resistance in segregating populations.

The research reported in this publiction was funded by the North Carolina Agric. Res. Service.

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