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This article in CS

  1. Vol. 35 No. 4, p. 1001-1006
     
    Received: July 5, 1994


    * Corresponding author(s): jap@gnvifas.ufl.edu
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doi:10.2135/cropsci1995.0011183X003500040012x

Genetic Control of a Long-Juvenile Trait in Soybean

  1. Jeffery D. Ray,
  2. Kuell Hinson ,
  3. J. Emmanuel Bidja Mankono and
  4. Maria F. Malo
  1. USDA-ARS, Agronomy Dep., Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0840
    Agronomy Dep., Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0840

Abstract

Abstract

The long-juvenile (LJ) trait in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] has been defined as delayed flowering under short-day conditions. The genetic control of this trait remains ambiguous in the literature, and this study was undertaken to determine the genetic control of the LJ trait. Three field experiments were conducted between 1984 and 1991. In the first experiment, segregation patterns of the LJ trait were examined in six F2 populations from crosses between conventional-juvenile (CJ) lines and P1 159925 (source of the LJ trait). Results indicated that the LJ trait is controlled by a single recessive gene influenced by the genetic background in which it occurs. In the second experiment, the confounding effect of other genes segregating for flowering was eliminated by studying F2 populations from crosses between members of four pairs of near isogenic lines primarily differing in the presence of the LJ trait. A total of 1954 F2 plants were observed from eight crosses. Within all F2 populations, the segregation patterns for the LJ trait had a good fit to a 3:1 ratio of CJ/LJ expected for a single recessive gene. The dominance relationship of the alleles was examined in the third experiment using F5 and F6 families developed from seven different crosses. Results indicated that the J allele, which conditions the CJ phenotype, is nearly completely dominant. Our results indicated that the LJ trait is controlled by a single recessive gene and the symbol J/j has been assigned for the alleles conditioning the flowering response (J-, CJ, and jj, LJ).

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Copyright © 1995. Crop Science Society of America, Inc.Copyright © 1995 by the Crop Science Society of America, Inc.