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This article in CS

  1. Vol. 35 No. 5, p. 1422-1425
     
    Received: July 7, 1994


    * Corresponding author(s): shearma@unlinfo.unl.edu
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doi:10.2135/cropsci1995.0011183X003500050027x

Mowing Height and Vertical Mowing Frequency Effects on Putting Green Quality

  1. T. A. Salaiz,
  2. G. L. Horst and
  3. R. C. Shearman 
  1. Dep. of Horticulture, 377 Plant Science, East Campus, Lincoln, NE 68583-0724

Abstract

Abstract

Lowering mowing heights to increase creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris Huds.) putting green speed (i.e., ball roll distance) is a common practice. This practice can increase turfgrass susceptibility to heat and drought stress. Other cultural practices might be used to improve putting green quality and speed without additional stress. In this study, vertical mowing was used as a grooming technique to potentially improve putting green quality and speed. A ‘Penncross’ creeping bentgrass turf, established in 1986, was mowed daily at 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm in combination with vertical mowing frequency treatments of 1 and 2 times per month, and a check of no vertical mowing. Mowing height and vertical mowing frequency effects on ball roll distance, turfgrass color and quality, and root production were evaluated in this study during 1989 and 1990. Vertical mowing treatments did not affect ball roll distance, turfgrass color and quality, or root production. Ball roll distance decreased by 0.2 m in 1989 and 0.4 m in 1990 as mowing height increased from 3.2 to 4.8 mm. Relative putting green speeds were rated as fast (i.e., > 2.6 m) across mowing height in 1989, and medium-fast to fast (i.e. 2.3–2.6 m) in 1990. Turfgrass color, quality, and root production increased with mowing height in 1989 and 1.0 unit in 1990. Turfgrass quality increased by 0.4 rating unit per mm increase in mowing height in 1989 and 1.0 unit in 1990. Root production at two soil depths of 75 to 150 mm and 150 to 225 mm increased with mowing height in 1990.

Journal series no. 10770, Agric. Res. Div., Univ. of Nebraska.

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Copyright © 1995. Crop Science Society of America, Inc.Copyright © 1995 by the Crop Science Society of America, Inc.