About Us | Help Videos | Contact Us | Subscriptions
 

Abstract

 

This article in CS

  1. Vol. 37 No. 6, p. 1878-1883
     
    Received: Dec 10, 1996


    * Corresponding author(s): rod.king@pi.csiro.au
 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions
Request Permissions
 Share

doi:10.2135/cropsci1997.0011183X003700060036x

Modified Gibberellins Retard Growth of Cool-Season Turfgrasses†

  1. R. W. King ,
  2. C. Blundell,
  3. L.T. Evans,
  4. L.N. Mander and
  5. J.T. Wood
  1. C SIRO Plant Industry, GPO Box 1600, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
    R esearch School of Chemistry, Institute of Advanced Studies, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
    C SIRO Mathematical and Information Sciences, GPO Box 664, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia

Abstract

Abstract

Several modified gibberellins which inhibit shoot elongation have been assessed as turfgrass growth retardants. Dichloro-methano 16,17-dihydro GA5 (DMDGA5) effectively inhibited growth of the cool season grasses, Festuca arundinacea Schreb., Poa pratensis L., and Lolium perenne L. Turf growth (weekly cutting dry weight) was reduced by up to 70% in three separate field trials over three seasons. This inhibition lasted up to 5 wk before recovery to control growth rates and, often, there was then a transient enhancement of growth. DMDGA5 inhibited turf growth to the same extent as did the commercial turfgrass retardant, Trinexapac-ethyl (commercially formulated as Primo, Novartis, Inc., Basel, Switzerland). Daily water use was also 25 to 30% less over at least 4 wk in studies with mini-swards growing in controlled environment conditions. With isolated plants of two cultivars of P. pratensis (cvs Holt and Bronco) grown in controlled conditions leaf elongation rates were more than three-fold greater in long than short daylengths. Both Trinexapac-ethyl and DMDGA5 blocked most of this growth increase as did a related derivative, 16,17-dihydro GA5. Since these compounds inhibit gibberellin biosynthesis it appears that the extra growth in long days arises from an increase in gibberellin content.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © .