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This article in CS

  1. Vol. 51 No. 2, p. 678-693
     
    Received: June 11, 2010


    * Corresponding author(s): david.walker@ars.usda.gov
    walkerdr@illinois.edu
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doi:10.2135/cropsci2010.06.0340

Evaluation of USDA Soybean Germplasm Accessions for Resistance to Soybean Rust in the Southern United States

  1. D. R. Walker *a,
  2. H. R. Boermab,
  3. D. V. Phillipsc,
  4. R. W. Schneiderd,
  5. J. B. Buckleye,
  6. E. R. Shipef,
  7. J. D. Muellerg,
  8. D. B. Weaverh,
  9. E. J. Sikorai,
  10. S. H. Moorej,
  11. G. L. Hartmana,
  12. M. R. Milesa,
  13. D. K. Harrisb,
  14. D. L. Wrightk,
  15. J. J. Maroisk and
  16. R. L. Nelsona
  1. a USDA-ARS Soybean/Maize Germplasm, Pathology and Genetics Research Unit and Univ. of Illinois, Dep. of Crop Sciences, Urbana, IL 61801
    b Univ. of Georgia, Dep. of Crop&Soil Sciences, Athens, GA 30602
    c Univ. of Georgia, Dep. of Plant Pathology, Griffin, GA 30223
    d Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Dep. of Plant Pathology and Crop Physiology, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
    e Louisiana State Univ. Agricultural Center, Bossier City, LA 71113
    f Clemson Univ., Dep. of Entomology, Soils,&Plant Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634
    g Clemson Univ., Dep. of Entomology, Soils,&Plant Sciences, Blackville, SC 29817
    h Auburn Univ., Dep. of Agronomy&Soils, Auburn, AL 36848
    i Auburn Univ., Dep. of Entomology&Plant Pathology, Auburn, AL 36848
    j Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Alexandria, LA 71302
    k Univ. of Florida, North Florida Research and Education Center, Quincy, FL 32351. Mention of a trademark, proprietary product, or vendor does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by the USDA or the University of Illinois and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products or vendors that may also be suitable

Abstract

Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] resistance to soybean rust (SBR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi could reduce reliance on fungicides to manage this disease. The objective of this study was to identify soybean germplasm with resistance to field populations of P. pachyrhizi in the United States. Field evaluations of 576 accessions from the USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection for resistance to SBR were conducted at seven locations in the southern United States between 2006 and 2008. Accessions from maturity groups (MG) 000 to X and North American susceptible check cultivars from each MG except X were rated for disease severity in all year–location environments, and for disease incidence, fungal sporulation, lesion type, and/or uredinia density in certain environments. While none of the accessions was immune in all environments, 64 were resistant in two or more locations each year that they were tested. Some accessions appeared to be more resistant in certain environments than in others. Of the original four Rpp genes described in the literature, Rpp1 provided the highest level of resistance, and among the accessions with uncharacterized Rpp genes, PI 567104B had the highest overall resistance across environments. The plant introductions confirmed to be resistant in these evaluations should be useful sources of genes for resistance to North American populations of P. pachyrhizi

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