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Forage & Grazinglands Abstract - Forage and Grazinglands Research

Using Forage Brassicas Under Irrigation in Mid-latitude, High-elevation Steppe/Desert Biomes

 

This article in FG

  1. Vol. 7 No. 1
     
    Accepted: Apr 2, 2009


    * Corresponding author(s): lmlaur@nmsu.edu
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doi:10.1094/FG-2009-0508-01-RS
  1. Leonard M. Lauriault *a,
  2. Steven J. Guldanb,
  3. Charles A. Martinc and
  4. Dawn M. VanLeeuwend
  1. a Forage Agronomist, Tucumcari Agricultural Science Center, New Mexico State University, Tucumcari, NM 88401
    b Superintendent, Agricultural Specialist, Alcalde Sustainable Agriculture Science Center, New Mexico State University, Alcalde, NM 87511
    c Agricultural Specialist, Alcalde Sustainable Agriculture Science Center, New Mexico State University, Alcalde, NM 87511; and
    d Agricultural Biometrician, Agricultural Biometrics Service, Agriculture Experiment Station, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003

Abstract

Brassicas may be useful for autumn forage in irrigated mid-latitude, high-elevation steppe/desert biomes. Aboveground dry matter yields and crude protein (CP) of kale (Brassica oleracea L.), rape (Brassica napus L.), and turnip (Brassica rapa L.) planted mid July and mid August were compared in northern New Mexico, USA, in multiple-location, three-cut [one 60 days after planting (DAP) and two 30-day regrowth periods] studies with four replications. Despite numerically lower first harvest yields for all species planted mid July, greater second harvest yields led to greater total yield for that planting (3005 kg/ha) compared to the August planting (2697 kg/ha). First harvest yields of all species were different (2105, 2899, and 2406 kg/ha for kale, rape, and turnip, respectively) and turnip had greater second cut yield than rape (314, 161, and 412 kg/ha for kale, rape, and turnip, respectively). Second cut yield by rape and third cut yields for all species were negligible. Kale total yields were lower than rape and turnip (2461, 3109, and 2983 kg/ha for kale, rape, and turnip, respectively). Species and planting date also affected CP. Rape has greatest yield potential for single-cut 60 DAP systems while turnip has better regrowth and sustained CP in these environments.

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