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Journal of Environmental Quality Abstract -

Acid Precipitation Effects on Growth and Yield Responses of Twenty Soybean and Twelve Snap Bean Cultivars

 

This article in JEQ

  1. Vol. 18 No. 2, p. 145-148
     
    Received: Jan 27, 1988


    * Corresponding author(s):
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doi:10.2134/jeq1989.00472425001800020002x
  1. M. R. Reddy *
  1. Department of Plant Science and Technology, North Carolina Agric. and Tech. State Univ., 1601 E. Market St., Greensboro, NC 27411.

Abstract

Abstract

Greenhouse studies were conducted to determine the effects of simulated acid precipitation on growth, yield, and nutrient content of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Twenty cultivars of soybean and twelve cultivars of snap bean were grown in pots and treated with simulated precipitation at pH 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, or 5.6 (control). Soybean and snap bean plants were treated with simulated precipitation once a week beginning until fruit maturity. Soybean plants showed leaf scorching and yellowing of leaves at pH 2.5 and 3.5, whereas snap bean did not show any visible symptoms. Soybean and snap bean cultivars responded differently to acid precipitation treatments. ‘McNair 700’ and ‘Pioneer 5482’ soybean and ‘Commodore’ bush and ‘Provider’ bush snap bean cultivars yields were decreased significantly under acid treatments. Eighteen soybean and 10 snap bean cultivars were unaffected. In general, acid precipitation treatments resulted in a greater number of soybean pods without seed compared to the control. Treatments at pH 3.5 and 2.5 affected soybean and snap bean growth and yield more than the other pH levels. Potassium content of soybean shoot decreased significantly under acid precipitation treatments, whereas Ca, Mg, and micronutrient contents were not affected by low pH treatment. Nutrient content of snap bean was unaffected by acidity.

Contribution from the Dep. of Plant Science and Technology, North Carolina Agric. and Techn. State Univ.

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