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Journal of Environmental Quality Abstract -

Organic and Inorganic Amendments to Reduce Ammonia Losses from Liquid Hog Manure

 

This article in JEQ

  1. Vol. 21 No. 4, p. 709-715
     
    Received: July 22, 1991


    * Corresponding author(s):
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doi:10.2134/jeq1992.00472425002100040028x
  1. T. Al-Kanani *,
  2. E. Akochi,
  3. A. F. MacKenzie,
  4. I. Alli and
  5. S. Barrington
  1. Box 119, Dep. of Earth Sciences, Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John's, NF A1B 3X5,
    Dep. of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill Univ., 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, PQ H9X 1C0,
    Dep. of Renewable Resources, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill Univ., 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, PQ H9X 1C0,
    Dep. of Agricultural Engineering, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill Univ., 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, PQ H9X 1C0.

Abstract

Abstract

Liquid hog manure (Sus scrofa domesticus) is in common use as a fertilizer or a soil conditioner in agricultural production. Liquid hog manure (LHM) suffers from N loss through volatilization of ammonia (NH3), however. Reduction of NH3 loss from 4% total solids LHM was studied using added Sphagnum peat moss (Sphagnum fuscum peat), sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), elemental S, and calcium carbonate. Cumulative losses of NH3-N ranged between 0 and 711 mg N kg−1 LHM applied. Elemental Sulfur and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) treatments induced greater NH3 losses compared with the nonamended LHM, whereas acidic treatments including Sphagnum peat moss (SM) reduced NH3 losses by at least 74.6%. Volatilization of NH3 from LHM increased as the pH of amended LHM treatment increased. The relationships between cumulative (15 d) NH3 volatilized and initial pH of amended LHM varied, depending on the amendment. The nutrient values of amended LHM stored for 25 d under continuous aeration were assessed on two soils mapped as Chicot (fine loamy, mixed, nonacid, mesic Typic Hapludoll) and Uplands (coarse loamy, mixed, nonacid, Typic Haplorthod) from eastern Canada. Treatment of LHM with SM at greater than 1% (w/w) reduced NH3 volatilization. Added CaCO3 increased NH3 loss. In general, amendments did not reduce effectiveness of LHM-N for barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) growth. An exception was the 1% SM + 2% CaCO3 amendment that reduced plant growth.

Supported by grant from the Ministere de l'Environment du Quebec.

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