About Us | Help Videos | Contact Us | Subscriptions
 

Abstract

 

This article in JEQ

  1. Vol. 28 No. 1, p. 350-353
     
    Received: Feb 24, 1998


    * Corresponding author(s): bx@pssci.umass.edu
 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions
Request Permissions
 Share

doi:10.2134/jeq1999.00472425002800010044x

Sorption of Organic Chemicals by Microfilters

  1. Baoshan Xing * and
  2. Zhaowei Jin
  1. Dep. of Plant and Soil Sciences, Stockbridge Hall, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003.

Abstract

Abstract

Inline syringe microfilters are often used for separating solid particles from the solution phase in environmental research and sample preparation for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis; but only limited information is available for retention of organic compounds by these microfilters. We here report on the results of naphthalene and toluene sorption by five polymer microfilters. The five filters had different polymers makeup for their membrane and housing and were: (i) nylon-polypropylene (NY-PP); (ii) borosilicate glass-acrylic (BA-AC); (iii) polyethersulfonc-acrylic (PS-AC); (iv) polyvinylidene difluoride-polypropylene (PV-PP); and (v) PTFE-polypropylene (PT-PP). Six aqueous concentrations over three orders of magnitude were used. All filters received five or six passages with each concentration solution. All of the five filters sorbed both naphthalene and toluene and sorption was largest at the first passage and declined with increasing number of passages. The sorption order of naphthalene (average of six concentrations at the first passage) was: BA-AC (98%) > PV-PP (93%) > NY-PP (64%) > PS-AC (49%) > PT-PP (13%) and toluene was: BA-AC (56%) > PV-PP (25%) > PT-PP (22%) ≥ PS-AC (20%) = NY-PP (20%). The magnitude sorption was generally independent of concentrations. These results suggest that suitability of polymer filters must be determined before actual use in environmental sampling and research involving organic chemicals, particularly ones with low solubility and polarity.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © .