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This article in JEQ

  1. Vol. 37 No. 2, p. 608-614
     
    Received: Oct 12, 2006
    Published: Mar, 2008


    * Corresponding author(s): fmmitloehner@ucdavis.edu
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doi:10.2134/jeq2006.0446

Effects of Sodium Bisulfate on Alcohol, Amine, and Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Slurry

  1. Huawei Suna,
  2. Yuee Panb,
  3. Yongjing Zhaoc,
  4. Wendi A. Jacksonb,
  5. Lisa M. Nucklesb,
  6. Irina L. Malkinab,
  7. Veronica E. Arteagab and
  8. Frank M. Mitloehner *b
  1. a Dep. of Biological & Agricultural Engineering, Univ. of California, Davis, 3060 Bainer Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616
    b Dep. of Animal Science, Univ. of California, Davis, 2151 Meyer Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616
    c Dep. of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, Univ. of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616

Abstract

Sodium bisulfate (SBS) is extensively used in the poultry industry to reduce ammonia and bacterial levels in litter. It is also used in the dairy industry to reduce bacterial counts in bedding and ammonia emissions, preventing environmental mastitis and calf respiratory stress. The present study measured the effect of SBS on the air emission of ammonia, amine, and alcohol from a dairy slurry mix. Amine flux was undetectable (<5 ng L−1) across treatments. Application of SBS decreased ammonia, methanol, and ethanol emissions from fresh dairy slurry. Ammonia emissions decreased with increasing levels of SBS treatment. The 3-d average ammonia flux from the control (no SBS applied) and the three different SBS surface application levels of 0.125, 0.250, and 0.375 kg m−2 were 513.4, 407.2, 294.8, and 204.5 mg h−1 m−2, respectively. The ammonia emission reduction potentials were 0, 21, 43, and 60%, respectively. Methanol and ethanol emissions decreased with an increase in the amount of SBS applied. The 3-d average methanol emissions were 223.7, 178.0, 131.6, and 87.0 mg h−1 m−2 for SBS surface application level of 0, 0.125, 0.250, and 0.375 kg m−2, with corresponding reduction potentials of 0, 20, 41, and 61, respectively. Similar emission reduction potentials of 0, 18, 35, and 58% were obtained for ethanol. Sodium bisulfate was shown to be effective in the mitigation of ammonia and alcohol emissions from fresh dairy slurry.

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Copyright © 2008. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science SocietyAmerican Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America