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This article in JEQ

  1. Vol. 41 No. 4, p. 1275-1283
    unlockOPEN ACCESS
     
    Received: Dec 8, 2011


    * Corresponding author(s): ingrid.rosendahl@uni-bonn.de
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doi:10.2134/jeq2011.0459

Persistence of the Fluoroquinolone Antibiotic Difloxacin in Soil and Lacking Effects on Nitrogen Turnover

  1. Ingrid Rosendahl *a,
  2. Jan Siemensa,
  3. Reimo Kindlerb,
  4. Joost Groenewegc,
  5. Judith Zimmermanna,
  6. Sonja Czerwinskid,
  7. Marc Lamshöftd,
  8. Volker Laabsa,
  9. Berndt-Michael Wilkeb,
  10. Harry Vereeckenc and
  11. Wulf Amelunga
  1. a Univ. of Bonn, Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation, Soil Science and Soil Ecology, Nussallee 13, 53115 Bonn, Germany
    b Berlin Univ. of Technology, Institute of Ecology, Waste Management and Environmental Research, Franklinstrasse 29, 10587 Berlin, Germany
    c Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences 3, Agrosphere, 52425 Jülich, Germany
    a Univ. of Bonn, Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation, Soil Science and Soil Ecology, Nussallee 13, 53115 Bonn, Germany; present address: Forsthaus, 56626 Andernach, Germany
    d Technical Univ. of Dortmund, Institute of Environmental Research, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 6, 44227 Dortmund, Germany
    a Univ. of Bonn, Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation, Soil Science and Soil Ecology, Nussallee 13, 53115 Bonn, Germany; present address: Gayerstraße 26, 67346 Speyer, Germany
    a Univ. of Bonn, Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation, Soil Science and Soil Ecology, Nussallee 13, 53115 Bonn, Germany. This project was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the Research Unit FOR 566 “Veterinary medicines in soil: basic research for risk assessment” (AM 134/6-3). Assigned to Associate Editor Kuldip Kumar

Abstract

The environmental risks caused by the use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics in human therapeutics and animal husbandry are associated with their persistence and (bio)accessibility in soil. To assess these aspects, we administered difloxacin to pigs and applied the contaminated manure to soil. We then evaluated the dissipation and sequestration of difloxacin in soil in the absence and presence of plants within a laboratory trial, a mesocosm trial, and a field trial. A sequential extraction yielded antibiotic fractions of differing binding strength. We also assessed the antibiotic's effects on nitrogen turnover in soil (potential nitrification and denitrification). Difloxacin was hardly (bio)accessible and was very persistent under all conditions studied (dissipation half-life in bulk soil, >217 d), rapidly forming nonextractable residues. Although varying environmental conditions did not affect persistence, dissipation was accelerated in soil surrounding plant roots. Effects on nitrogen turnover were limited due to the compound's strong binding and small (bio)accessibility despite its persistence.

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Copyright © 2012. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.