About Us | Help Videos | Contact Us | Subscriptions
 

Table of Contents

 
 

Volume 44 Issue 5, September-October 2015



Hide Details
  • SPECIAL SECTION: MICROBIAL TRANSPORT AND FATE IN THE SUBSURFACE up

    • Scott A. Bradford, Jack Schijven and Thomas Harter
      Microbial Transport and Fate in the Subsurface Environment: Introduction to the Special Section
      Core Ideas
      • Brings together recent research on microbial occurrence, fate, and transport in the subsurface.
      • Papers include field reconnaissance, controlled laboratory studies, and mathematical models.
      • Work adds to the knowledge base to protect water resources and perform environmental remediation.
      • Findings identify critical knowledge gaps, conditions of increased risks, and model limitations.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.07.0375
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1333-1337
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Get Permissions ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
    • Ryan A. Blaustein, Yakov A. Pachepsky, Daniel R. Shelton and Robert L. Hill
      Release and Removal of Microorganisms from Land-Deposited Animal Waste and Animal Manures: A Review of Data and Models
      Core Ideas
      • The first in-depth review on bacteria release from manure is compiled.
      • Release and removal mechanisms and factors are outlined.
      • Differences in bacteria release between manure types are elucidated.
      • The release kinetics models are compared and discussed.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0077
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1338-1354
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
    • Robert Michitsch, Rob Jamieson, Robert Gordon, Glenn Stratton and Craig Lake
      Bacterial Pathogen Indicator Transport from Livestock Mortality Biopiles
      Core Ideas
      • Biopiles can dispose of slaughterhouse residuals that contain pathogenic bacteria.
      • Indicator bacteria loads in effluent decreased due to retention, inactivation and death.
      • Indicator bacteria movement through biopiles and soil was consistent with preferential flow.
      • Enterococcaceae indicators regrew in higher soil water contents and lower biopile temperatures.
      • Unsaturated biopile and soil conditions should be maintained to impede bacterial movement.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0034
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1355-1365
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
    • Nanxi Lu, Arash Massoudieh, Xiaomeng Liang, Dehong Hu, Tamir Kamai, Timothy R. Ginn, Julie L. Zilles and Thanh H. Nguyen
      Swimming Motility Reduces Azotobacter vinelandii Deposition to Silica Surfaces
      Core Ideas
      • Statistical cluster analyses of cell trajectories separated actively swimming cells from nonswimming ones.
      • Motility was evaluated in multiple porous media model systems with increasing complexity.
      • Strong motility changed trajectories near the surface and reduced attachment.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0141
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1366-1375
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Qiulan Zhang, A. Raoof and S. M. Hassanizadeh
      Pore-Scale Study of Flow Rate on Colloid Attachment and Remobilization in a Saturated Micromodel
      Core Ideas
      • Colloid remobilization in response to transients in flow rate was visualized.
      • Pore-network modeling was used to model concentration breakthrough curves.
      • At larger flow rate, less attachment was observed.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0058
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1376-1383
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ] [ Supplement 2 ]
    • Lee Burbery, Louise Weaver, Bronwyn Humphries and Jan Gregor
      Efficacy of Coral Sand for Removal of Escherichia coli and Bacteriophage under Saturated Flow Conditions
      Core Ideas
      • Effective removal rates of model pathogens were measured for saturated coral sand.
      • Lab-based transport experiments used E. coli J6-2 and MS2 bacteriophage.
      • Coral sand is effective at filtering E. coli, with removal rates of 0.02–0.07 log cm−1.
      • Coral sand did not provide significant natural attenuation of MS2 bacteriophage.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0044
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1384-1391
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
    • Margaret E. Stevenson, Regina Sommer, Gerhard Lindner, Andreas H. Farnleitner, Simon Toze, Alexander K.T. Kirschner, Alfred P. Blaschke and Jatinder P.S. Sidhu
      Attachment and Detachment Behavior of Human Adenovirus and Surrogates in Fine Granular Limestone Aquifer Material
      Core Ideas
      • Adenovirus was compared to three surrogates: 100-nm particles and MS2 and PRD1 bacteriophages.
      • Column tests were performed in experiments using fine granular limestone aquifer material.
      • Column experiments under variable chemical conditions have not been done before using adenovirus.
      • PRD1 bacteriophage was the best surrogate to model the attachment of adenovirus but not detachment.
      • Implications of the work could influence interpretation of experiments using surrogates.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0052
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1392-1401
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
    • J. P. S. Sidhu, S. Toze, L. Hodgers, K. Barry, D. Page, Y. Li and P. Dillon
      Pathogen Decay during Managed Aquifer Recharge at Four Sites with Different Geochemical Characteristics and Recharge Water Sources
      Core Ideas
      • Pathogens decay in aquifers is influenced by the site specific aspects.
      • Aquifer characteristics, geochemistry, and type of source water influence pathogen decay.
      • Enteric viruses are the critical pathogens from a public health perspective.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0118
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1402-1412
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
    • Ronald W. Harvey, David W. Metge, Denis R. LeBlanc, Jen Underwood, George R. Aiken, Kenna Butler, Timothy D. McCobb and Jay Jasperse
      Importance of the Colmation Layer in the Transport and Removal of Cyanobacteria, Viruses, and Dissolved Organic Carbon during Natural Lake-Bank Filtration
      Core Ideas
      • More than 98% of cyanobacteria, coliphages, and viruses being tracked were removed in the colmation layer.
      • Modified Lee-type seepage meters are useful for conducting colloid transport studies at the bottom of lakes.
      • 44% of the pond dissolved organic C transported into the aquifer was removed within the colmation layer.
      • Transport through the colmation layer resulted in a substantive change in dissolved organic C character.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0151
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1413-1423
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Emmanuelle Arnaud, Anna Best, Beth L. Parker, Ramon Aravena and Kari Dunfield
      Transport of Escherichia coli through a Thick Vadose Zone
      Core Ideas
      • E. coli was detected in groundwater 1 wk after manure application.
      • Underlying bedrock aquifer was contaminated despite a 12-m-thick vadose zone.
      • Results challenge our understanding of transport and fate in thick unsaturated zone.
      • Microbial transport to the deep water table suggests active preferential pathways.
      • Persistent low levels of E. coli suggest continued mobilization of bacteria.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0067
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1424-1434
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Xunde Li, Edward R. Atwill, Elizabeth Antaki, Olin Applegate, Brian Bergamaschi, Ronald F. Bond, Jennifer Chase, Katherine M. Ransom, William Samuels, Naoko Watanabe and Thomas Harter
      Fecal Indicator and Pathogenic Bacteria and Their Antibiotic Resistance in Alluvial Groundwater of an Irrigated Agricultural Region with Dairies
      Core Ideas
      • Systemic surveys of groundwater microbiological quality are performed at site and regional scales.
      • Confined animal systems are chronic sources of pathogens and high enteric microbial loads.
      • Pathogen loading to groundwater is effectively mitigated by alluvial aquifer system.
      • Some microbial indicators are too ubiquitous to be useful as indicators.
      • Antibiotic resistance from CAFOs and human sources affects the alluvial aquifer system.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0139
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1435-1447
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
    • Raymond M. Flynn, German Mallèn, Marion Engel, Ashraf Ahmed and Pierre Rossi
      Characterizing Aquifer Heterogeneity Using Bacterial and Bacteriophage Tracers
      Core Ideas
      • Comparative tracer test in sand and gravel aquifer.
      • Use of similarly sized bacterial tracers and similarly charged bacterium and virus.
      • Microbiological tracer responses used to investigate subsurface heterogeneity.
      • Tracer test results reconciled with outcrop observations.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0117
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1448-1458
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
    • Ivan Morales, José A. Amador and Thomas Boving
      Bacteria Transport in a Soil-Based Wastewater Treatment System under Simulated Operational and Climate Change Conditions
      Core Ideas
      • Retention of E. coli was modeled in a conventional onsite wastewater treatment.
      • The model was run under varied operational and climate changing conditions.
      • Lower hydraulic loading rate values removed more E. coli due to unsaturated conditions.
      • Precipitation and warmer soil temperatures affect E. coli removal in the soil.
      • Higher soil temperatures increased E. coli die-off rates and system performance.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.12.0547
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1459-1472
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Feike J. Leij, Scott A. Bradford, Yusong Wang and Antonella Sciortino
      Langmuirian Blocking of Irreversible Colloid Retention: Analytical Solution, Moments, and Setback Distance
      Core Ideas
      • Analytical solution for blocking of colloid retention.
      • Determination of zero and first moments.
      • Expressions for setback distance and arrival time.
      • Simulation of Escherichia coli D21g transport and retention.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0147
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1473-1482
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Hehuan Liao, Leigh-Anne H. Krometis, Karen Kline and W. C. Hession
      Long-Term Impacts of Bacteria–Sediment Interactions in Watershed-Scale Microbial Fate and Transport Modeling
      Core Ideas
      • The HSPF model was modified to account for bacteria–sediment interactions.
      • Both water and sediment FIB concentrations were calibrated to observational data.
      • Improved model performance was achieved as compared to previous efforts.
      • Long-term impact of bacteria–sediment interactions in FIB predictions was negligible.
      • Watershed-specific characteristics likely affect the impact of sediment.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0169
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1483-1490
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
    • Jack Schijven, Julia Derx, Ana Maria de Roda Husman, Alfred Paul Blaschke and Andreas H. Farnleitner
      QMRAcatch: Microbial Quality Simulation of Water Resources including Infection Risk Assessment
      Core Ideas
      • QMRAcatch is a generic catchment model with an easy-to-use interactive interface.
      • The model domain of QMRAcatch is a main river with a floodplain and floodplain river.
      • QMRAcatch simulates microbial quality of water resources including risk assessment.
      • Can be used for high- and low-income regions and in view of climate/land use change.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0048
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1491-1502
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
  • ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES up

    • J. Thad Scott and Brian E. Haggard
      Implementing Effects-Based Water Quality Criteria for Eutrophication in Beaver Lake, Arkansas: Linking Standard Development and Assessment Methodology
      Core Ideas
      • Linking water quality assessment methods to standard development has not been well established for numeric nutrient criteria.
      • Effects-based criteria are becoming more common but with little consideration of intra- and interannual variability and their influence on assessment.
      • Failure to consider assessment options in advance could result in unintended consequences during water quality assessment.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0020
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1503-1512
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
  • ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTANTS AND TRACE GASES up

    • Steven A. Cryer, Patrick L. Havens, David E. Hillger and Ian J. van Wesenbeeck
      An Improved Indirect Procedure for Estimating Pesticide Volatility from Field Trials
      Core Ideas
      • The classical back-calculation method is refined using optimization (BCMO).
      • The classical BCMO consistently improved flux estimates for all pesticides and scenarios investigated.
      • The classical BCMO can separate measured air concentrations to respective contributing sources.
      • The classical BCMO offers an improved alternative to the original methodology for all pesticides.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0125
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1513-1522
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
    • Hung V. Le, Eric C. Sivret, Gavin Parcsi and Richard M. Stuetz
      Impact of Storage Conditions on the Stability of Volatile Sulfur Compounds in Sampling Bags
      Core Ideas
      • Predictive models accommodate quick loss predictions for 10 VSCs.
      • Significant temperature and humidity interaction effects on VSC stability observed.
      • Significant light and humidity interaction effects on VSC stability observed.
      • Maximum storage of 18 h recommended in Tedlar to retain at least 75% of the VSCs.
      • Maximum storage of 12 h in Mylar and Nalophan to retain at least 74% of the VSCs.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.12.0532
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1523-1529
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Branly Eugene, Philip A. Moore, Hong Li, Dana Miles, Steven Trabue, Robert Burns and Michael Buser
      Effect of Alum Additions to Poultry Litter on In-House Ammonia and Greenhouse Gas Concentrations and Emissions
      Core Ideas
      • Alum additions did affect NH3 concentrations in poultry houses.
      • Alum additions did affect NH3 emissions from poultry houses.
      • Alum additions did affect CO2 emissions from poultry houses.
      • Alum additions did not affect N2O and CH4 emissions from poultry houses.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.09.0404
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1530-1540
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
  • BIOREMEDIATION AND BIODEGRADATION up

    • Nicholson N. Jeke, Francis Zvomuya, Nazim Cicek, Lisette Ross and Pascal Badiou
      Biomass, Nutrient, and Trace Element Accumulation and Partitioning in Cattail ( Typha latifolia L.) during Wetland Phytoremediation of Municipal Biosolids
      Core Ideas
      • Wetland system using cattail can remove contaminants from biosolids.
      • Wetland-based phytoremediation is more effective with two harvests than one harvest.
      • Phytoextraction is optimized if plants are harvested at maximum aboveground contaminant accumulation.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0064
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1541-1549
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
  • ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY up

    • Robert S. Dungan and April B. Leytem
      Detection of Purple Sulfur Bacteria in Purple and Non-purple Dairy Wastewaters
      Core Ideas
      • PSB are often associated with reduced odors from livestock lagoons.
      • PSB were found in both purple and non-purple dairy wastewaters.
      • All dairy lagoons contained gene sequences similar to that of Thiocapsa roseopersicina.
      • It may be possible to stimulate the growth of PSB in non-purple ponds without inoculation.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0128
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1550-1555
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Emma C. Stea, Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen, Rob C. Jamieson and Christopher K. Yost
      Fecal Contamination in the Surface Waters of a Rural- and an Urban-Source Watershed
      Core Ideas
      • Human marker (HF183) detection revealed human fecal contamination in both watersheds.
      • Ruminant markers (BacR and CowM2) only occurred in the rural watershed (6%).
      • The mtDNA markers were less sensitive due to lower initial fecal copy numbers.
      • E. coli ≥100 CFU 100 mL−1 or turbidity ≥1 NTU increased the odds of pathogen presence.
      • Storm events increased detection of pathogens and MST markers in the rural watershed.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.11.0459
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1556-1567
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
  • ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS, MODULES, AND DATASETS up

    • Lauren E. Padilla, Michael F. Winchell and Scott H. Jackson
      Evaluation of AGRO-2014 for Predicting Hydrophobic Organic Chemical Concentrations in Ponds
      Core Ideas
      • Novel comparison of three receiving-water models for predicting pesticide exposure.
      • Comparison of model predictions to mesocosm observed pyrethroid concentrations.
      • Evaluates importance of explicitly modeling sediment dynamics for hydrophobic organic chemicals.
      • Dynamic sediment processes significantly affected model results of high-KOC chemicals.
      • Introduction of the refined AGRO-2014 model for pesticide exposure modeling.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0149
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1568-1578
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
  • HEAVY METALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT up

    • Ana J. Hernández, María J. Gutiérrez-Ginés and Jesús Pastor
      Benefits of the Use of Sewage Sludge over EDTA to Remediate Soils Polluted with Heavy Metals
      Core Ideas
      • Ecological effects of sewage sludge and EDTA amendment on heavy metal–polluted soils are evaluated.
      • Amendments do not change significantly the properties of soil.
      • EDTA increases loss of nutrients and metals through leachates and enhances metal uptake by plants.
      • EDTA causes toxicity in the plant community (decrease in phytomass production and plant diversity).
      • Sewage sludge improves establishment of natural plant cover compared with nonamended soil.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0017
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1579-1588
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
  • LANDSCAPE AND WATERSHED PROCESSES up

    • M. D. Sunohara, N. Gottschall, G. Wilkes, E. Craiovan, E. Topp, Z. Que, O. Seidou, S.K. Frey and D. R. Lapen
      Long-Term Observations of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Export in Paired-Agricultural Watersheds under Controlled and Conventional Tile Drainage
      Core Ideas
      • Paired watershed study evaluates conventional and control drainage impacts at watershed scale.
      • Controlled tile drainage imposed en masse at watershed scales reduces stream, nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved reactive P fluxes during the growing season.
      • Total P fluxes in stream were shown to reduce and increase depending on location in watershed.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0008
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1589-1604
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
    • Louise R.M. Barthod, Kui Liu, David A. Lobb, Philip N. Owens, Núria Martínez-Carreras, Alexander J. Koiter, Ellen L. Petticrew, Gregory K. McCullough, Cenwei Liu and Leticia Gaspar
      Selecting Color-based Tracers and Classifying Sediment Sources in the Assessment of Sediment Dynamics Using Sediment Source Fingerprinting
      Core Ideas
      • Defining sources and testing the behavior of tracers are critical for sediment source apportionment.
      • The predominant sources of river sediment varied at different reaches of the study creek.
      • Integrating color and conventional fingerprinting techniques likely improves source apportionment.
      • Color fingerprinting is a promising, cost-effective technique for sediment source ascription.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0043
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1605-1616
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
    • J. J. Jiménez, N. Darwiche-Criado, R. Sorando, F. A. Comín and J. M. Sánchez-Pérez
      A Methodological Approach for Spatiotemporally Analyzing Water-Polluting Effluents in Agricultural Landscapes Using Partial Triadic Analysis
      Core Ideas
      • The spatiality of the physicochemical properties of water along a river is demonstrated.
      • PTA can efficiently summarize site-specific water chemistry patterns.
      • Significant positive and negative autocorrelation at several distance lags was shown.
      • PTA is useful for evaluating and monitoring water quality.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.09.0377
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1617-1630
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
  • ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ENVIRONMENT up

    • Guixiang Quan, Chuntao Yin, Tianming Chen and Jinlong Yan
      Degradation of Herbicide Mesotrione in Three Soils with Differing Physicochemical Properties from China
      Core Ideas
      • Mesotrione degraded fastest in nonsterilized paddy soil with half-life ∼8.53 d.
      • Degradation of mesotrione was strongly affected by soil microbial activity.
      • Degradation rate constant was highly correlated with soil pH value and organic matter content.
      • Promoting degradation effect of solar light was found.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.12.0528
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1631-1637
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
  • PLANT AND ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS up

    • Aaron L. M. Daigh, Xiaobo Zhou, Matthew J. Helmers, Carl H. Pederson, Robert Horton, Meghann Jarchow and Matt Liebman
      Subsurface Drainage Nitrate and Total Reactive Phosphorus Losses in Bioenergy-Based Prairies and Corn Systems
      Core Ideas
      • Bioenergy prairies limited NO3–N losses in subsurface drainage even when N fertilizer was applied.
      • Bioenergy continuous corn with cover crop can supply feedstocks while minimizing NO3–N losses.
      • Drainage TRP concentrations in bioenergy systems need evaluation in areas with high P losses.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0080
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1638-1646
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
  • SURFACE WATER QUALITY up

    • Natasha Bell, Richard A. C. Cooke, Todd Olsen, Mark B. David and Robert Hudson
      Characterizing the Performance of Denitrifying Bioreactors during Simulated Subsurface Drainage Events
      Core Ideas
      • Bioreactors successfully reduced nitrate loads from drainage tiles.
      • Nitrate removal rate was independent of hydraulic residence time.
      • Initially high DRP and DO were reduced after a month of operation.
      • Temperature and residence time explained 85% of the variance in N load reduction.
      • Temperature and residence time explained 66% of the variance in N removal rate.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.04.0162
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1647-1656
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
    • Sarah A. Doydora, Dorcas Franklin, Peizhe Sun, Miguel Cabrera, Aaron Thompson, Kimberly Love-Myers, John Rema, Vaughn Calvert, Spyros G. Pavlostathis and Ching-Hua Huang
      Alum and Rainfall Effects on Ionophores in Runoff from Surface-Applied Broiler Litter
      Core Ideas
      • Two methods to reduce anticoccidials in runoff from grasslands receiving broiler litter.
      • Ionophore losses in surface runoff can be reduced by adding alum to broiler litter.
      • Ionophores in runoff decreased when rainfall occurs 2 to 4 weeks after broiler litter application.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0099
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1657-1666
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      [ Supplement 1 ]
  • VADOSE ZONE PROCESSES AND CHEMICAL TRANSPORT up

    • Marco Napoli, Stefano Cecchi, Camillo A. Zanchi and Simone Orlandini
      Leaching of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid through Silty Clay Soil Columns under Outdoor Conditions
      Core Ideas
      • Leaching of glyphosate and AMPA was assessed in 1-m soil columns.
      • Glyphosate and AMPA may be transported in leachates through 100 cm of silty clay soil profile.
      • About 0.82%, on average, of the total glyphosate applied was recovered in soil and leachate.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0104
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1667-1673
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
  • WASTE MANAGEMENT up

    • J. G. Murnane, R. B. Brennan, M. G. Healy and O. Fenton
      Use of Zeolite with Alum and Polyaluminum Chloride Amendments to Mitigate Runoff Losses of Phosphorus, Nitrogen, and Suspended Solids from Agricultural Wastes Applied to Grassed Soils
      Core Ideas
      • Surface runoff studies have mainly focused on mitigation of one contaminant.
      • This paper optimizes mitigation of two contaminants by optimizing amendments.
      • Zeolite and chemical mixtures increased N and P removal from agricultural waste.
      • More N and P were removed from zeolite and chemical mixtures than chemicals only.
      • Zeolite and chemical mixtures improved suspended solids removal from dairy soiled water runoff.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.07.0319
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1674-1683
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
  • WETLANDS AND AQUATIC PROCESSES up

    • Julia G. Lazar, Kelly Addy, Arthur J. Gold, Peter M. Groffman, Richard A. McKinney and Dorothy Q. Kellogg
      Beaver Ponds: Resurgent Nitrogen Sinks for Rural Watersheds in the Northeastern United States
      Core Ideas
      • In rural watersheds of southern New England with high N loading, denitrification from beaver ponds may remove 5–45% of watershed nitrate-N loading.
      • Beaver ponds represent a relatively new, substantial sink for watershed N if current beaver populations persist.
      • Denitrification had the highest rates of nitrate transformation in our beaver pond study, with N2 as the dominant product.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.12.0540
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1684-1693
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
      unlockOPEN ACCESS
  • SHORT COMMUNICATIONS up

    • Tricia Coakley, Gail M. Brion and Alan E. Fryar
      Prevalence of and Relationship between Two Human-Associated DNA Biomarkers for Bacteroidales in an Urban Watershed
      Core Ideas
      • The HuBac biomarker is linearly correlated to the more specific qHF183 biomarker.
      • Determine location, rather than identify an unknown source, with a more sensitive biomarker.
      • HuBac and qHF183 may be used in urban watershed studies.
      • A more sensitive marker is preferred when “less than” values are problematic in modeling.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.11.0494
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2015 44:1694-1698
      [ Abstract ][ Full Text ] [ PDF ] [ Tables Only ] [ Figures Only ] [ Get Permissions ]
  • Facebook   Twitter