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Table of Contents

 
 

Volume 45 Issue 1, January-February 2016



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  • EDITORIAL up

  • SPECIAL SECTION: SOIL IN THE CITY up

    • Kuldip Kumar and Lakhwinder S. Hundal
      Soil in the City: Sustainably Improving Urban Soils
      Core Ideas
      • Urban soils are contaminated by priority pollutants due to anthropogenic activities.
      • Urban soils quality can be improved by using local resources such as composts and biosolids.
      • Improving soils is key to improving the overall ecosystem functioning in urban areas.
      • These papers are a resource for policymakers, practitioners, and the general public.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.11.0589
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:2-8
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    • Nele Delbecque and Ann Verdoodt
      Spatial Patterns of Heavy Metal Contamination by Urbanization
      Core Ideas
      • Urban pollution index maps reveal anthropogenic soil heavy metal (HM) enrichment.
      • In Ghent, soil HM enrichment is generally most pronounced for Ni, Cu, Pb, and Zn.
      • In Ghent, soil HM enrichment by As, Cd, Cr, and Hg is on average low.
      • Spatial patterns of HM enrichment reflect historical industrial contamination.
      • Time since development and land use relate to HM enrichment.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.11.0508
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:9-17
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    • James A. Montgomery, Christie A. Klimas, Joseph Arcus, Christian DeKnock, Kathryn Rico, Yarency Rodriguez, Katherine Vollrath, Ellen Webb and Allison Williams
      Soil Quality Assessment Is a Necessary First Step for Designing Urban Green Infrastructure
      Core Ideas
      • We assessed soil quality on four abandoned lots on the south side of Chicago.
      • Some soils had mean total Pb concentrations >400 ppm.
      • Mean bioavailable Pb was 12%.
      • Most total Pb was not bioavailable.
      • Soil quality was generally poor on all lots and showed high spatial variability.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.04.0192
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:18-25
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    • Sally L. Brown, Rufus L. Chaney and Ganga M. Hettiarachchi
      Lead in Urban Soils: A Real or Perceived Concern for Urban Agriculture?
      Core Ideas
      • Urban agriculture offers a wide range of public health and ecosystem benefits.
      • Urban soil contamination is perceived to be a risk to urban agriculture.
      • Urban agriculture is not likely to pose any additional health risks associated with soil Pb.
      • Best urban farming practices are also best practices to limit any risk associated with soil Pb.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.07.0376
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:26-36
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    • John F. Obrycki, Nicholas T. Basta, Kirk Scheckel, Brooke N. Stevens and Kristen K. Minca
      Phosphorus Amendment Efficacy for In Situ Remediation of Soil Lead Depends on the Bioaccessible Method
      Core Ideas
      • The ability of soil amendments to reduce IVBA Pb depended on the in vitro method.
      • Modified USEPA Method 1340 may predict bioaccessible Pb in P-amended soil.
      • Soil amendments were largely ineffective in reducing IVBA Pb using USEPA Method 1340.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.05.0244
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:37-44
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    • Marie R. Johnston, Nick J. Balster and Jun Zhu
      Impact of Residential Prairie Gardens on the Physical Properties of Urban Soil in Madison, Wisconsin
      Core Ideas
      • Four soil physical properties were similar in prairie gardens and turfgrass lawns.
      • Hydraulic conductivity, strength, bulk density, and organic matter differ by depth.
      • Prairie gardens show a consistent trend and directional shift in surface properties.
      • Prairie gardens had little impact on subsoil despite their purported benefit.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0093
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:45-52
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    • Dominic A. Brose, Lakhwinder S. Hundal, Olawale O. Oladeji, Kuldip Kumar, Thomas C. Granato, Albert Cox and Zainul Abedin
      Greening a Steel Mill Slag Brownfield with Biosolids and Sediments: A Case Study
      Core Ideas
      • Biosolids and sediment blends provide ideal growing medium for greening steel mill slag brownfield sites.
      • Use of biosolids for greening steel mill slag sites has no impact on the surface and groundwater quality.
      • Turfgrass performs better in biosolids-amended plots.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.09.0456
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:53-61
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    • Sara C. Koropchak, W. Lee Daniels, Abbey Wick, G. Richard Whittecar and Nick Haus
      Beneficial Use of Dredge Materials for Soil Reconstruction and Development of Dredge Screening Protocols
      Core Ideas
      • Over 750,000 m3 of freshwater and saline dredge materials converted to productive soils.
      • New screening protocols developed integrating dredge properties with agronomic considerations.
      • Transformations of saline materials documented along with risks to local soil and water quality.
      • The importance of recognizing and treating potentially acid-forming materials is emphasized.
      • Potential for use of dredge materials as topsoil substitutes discussed.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.12.0529
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:62-73
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    • N. T. Basta, D. M. Busalacchi, L. S. Hundal, K. Kumar, R. P. Dick, R. P. Lanno, J. Carlson, A. E. Cox and T. C. Granato
      Restoring Ecosystem Function in Degraded Urban Soil Using Biosolids, Biosolids Blend, and Compost
      Core Ideas
      • Compost and biosolids restored urban degraded soil with minimal impact.
      • Biosolids and compost greatly increased critical soil ecosystem services.
      • Biosolids outperformed compost in soil quality, vegetation, and earthworm measures.
      • Pharmaceuticals in runoff water were below the probable no-effect levels.
      • Biosolids-treatments increased diversity in established native prairie.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0009
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:74-83
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    • Arjun K. Venkatesan, Abdul-Hakeem M. Hamdan, Vanessa M. Chavez, Jasmine D. Brown and Rolf U. Halden
      Mass Balance Model for Sustainable Phosphorus Recovery in a US Wastewater Treatment Plant
      Core Ideas
      • Mass balance model shows feasibility of sustainable P recovery in a US wastewater treatment plant.
      • 491 tonnes/yr of P can be recovered as struvite from a single sewage treatment plant.
      • Estimated P sales to fertilizer industries are valued at $150,000 per year.
      • Estimated payback period as low as 3 yr for WWTP with existing enhanced biological P removal system.
      • On a national scale, model predicts 16% potential reduction in P mining needs.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.11.0504
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:84-89
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    • Giada Brandani, Marco Napoli, Luciano Massetti, Martina Petralli and Simone Orlandini
      Urban Soil: Assessing Ground Cover Impact on Surface Temperature and Thermal Comfort
      Core Ideas
      • In the daytime, average sun-to-shadow Tair, ATI, and Ts differences were positive for all surfaces.
      • The nighttime Ts differences were only significantly negative for grass and gravel.
      • The nighttime ATI differences were always significantly positive for all the surfaces.
      • The nighttime Tair differences were often significantly negative for all surfaces.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.12.0521
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:90-97
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    • Sally Brown, Amber Corfman, Katrina Mendrey, Kate Kurtz and Fritz Grothkopp
      Stormwater Bioretention Systems: Testing the Phosphorus Saturation Index and Compost Feedstocks as Predictive Tools for System Performance
      Core Ideas
      • Phosphorus saturation index predicts phosphorus movement in bioretention systems.
      • Compost feedstocks are not a good predictor of bioretention performance.
      • All bioretention mixtures had high copper removal.
      • Plant response varied by phosphorus saturation index and compost type.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.10.0414
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:98-106
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Michelle C. Kondo, Raghav Sharma, Alain F. Plante, Yunwen Yang and Igor Burstyn
      Elemental Concentrations in Urban Green Stormwater Infrastructure Soils
      Core Ideas
      • A unique study of elemental concentrations in green stormwater infrastructure soils.
      • Elements posing health risk were the same or lower in GSI compared with non-GSI soils.
      • However, Cd, Hg, and Pb concentrations were greater than soil cleanup objectives.
      • Calcium and iodine concentrations were greater than background levels at GSI sites.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.10.0421
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:107-118
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
  • SPECIAL SECTION: THE URBAN FOREST AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES up

    • S. J. Livesley, E. G. McPherson and C. Calfapietra
      The Urban Forest and Ecosystem Services: Impacts on Urban Water, Heat, and Pollution Cycles at the Tree, Street, and City Scale
      Core Ideas
      • The urban forest can be managed to impact the urban water, heat, carbon, and pollution cycles.
      • An evidence base is needed for the ecosystem service benefit urban trees can provide.
      • This special section presents 14 studies from five continents on the ecosystem service impact of urban trees.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.11.0567
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:119-124
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    • Hirofumi Sugawara, Shogo Shimizu, Hideo Takahashi, Shinsuke Hagiwara, Ken-ichi Narita, Takehiko Mikami and Tatsuki Hirano
      Thermal Influence of a Large Green Space on a Hot Urban Environment
      Core Ideas
      • The park is 1.5 to 3 K cooler than the surrounding town in summer daytime.
      • The park cooler air was advected to the urban area until a maximum extent of 450 m.
      • The extent of thermal influence gets larger on the slope down to the town.
      • The park breeze occurred more frequently in calm conditions late at night.
      • Amount of town cooling by the park corresponds to 2600 room air-conditioning units.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0049
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:125-133
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    • Madhumitha Jaganmohan, Sonja Knapp, Carsten M. Buchmann and Nina Schwarz
      The Bigger, the Better? The Influence of Urban Green Space Design on Cooling Effects for Residential Areas
      Core Ideas
      • The cooling effect of urban forests is higher than that of urban parks.
      • The differences in temperature and cooling distance measure different aspects of the cooling effects.
      • The influence of size on the cooling effects is stronger than the influence of the shape.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0062
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:134-145
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    • Marco Napoli, Luciano Massetti, Giada Brandani, Martina Petralli and Simone Orlandini
      Modeling Tree Shade Effect on Urban Ground Surface Temperature
      Core Ideas
      • A heat transfer model with a routine for estimating the tree canopies effect was proposed.
      • Surface temperature of lawn and asphalt under different trees shading conditions were measured.
      • The model provided good predictions of the temperatures for lawn and asphalt under different trees.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0097
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:146-156
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    • Mónica Ballinas and Víctor L. Barradas
      The Urban Tree as a Tool to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island in Mexico City: A Simple Phenomenological Model
      Core Ideas
      • Urban heat island mitigation by vegetation with emphasis on urban trees.
      • A phenomenological model of UHI mitigation based on urban energy balance.
      • Tree transpiration as a mechanism to urban heat island mitigation.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0056
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:157-166
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    • Ruzana Sanusi, Denise Johnstone, Peter May and Stephen J. Livesley
      Street Orientation and Side of the Street Greatly Influence the Microclimatic Benefits Street Trees Can Provide in Summer
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0039
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:167-174
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    • J. Deak Sjöman, A. Hirons and H. Sjöman
      Branch Area Index of Solitary Trees: Understanding Its Significance in Regulating Ecosystem Services
      Core Ideas
      • Branch density and architectural make up of solitaire trees differ in winter.
      • Branch area indices vary significantly between species and genotypes of trees.
      • Different branch area indices will influence mean radiant temperature and wind speed in a complex urban setting.
      • The results are discussed with regards to the design of urban green space.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0069
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:175-187
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    • Qingfu Xiao and E. Gregory McPherson
      Surface Water Storage Capacity of Twenty Tree Species in Davis, California
      Core Ideas
      • Quantitative analysis of surface water storage capacities for 20 urban tree species.
      • Surface water storage capacities varied threefold among tree species.
      • Conifers had the highest storage capacities and simulated interception rates.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0092
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:188-198
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    • Bryant C. Scharenbroch, Justin Morgenroth and Brian Maule
      Tree Species Suitability to Bioswales and Impact on the Urban Water Budget
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0060
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:199-206
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • E. C. Denman, P. B. May and G. M. Moore
      The Potential Role of Urban Forests in Removing Nutrients from Stormwater
      Core Ideas
      • Street trees reduced N and P concentrations compared with unplanted profiles.
      • Street trees receiving stormwater generally grew larger.
      • Differences between tree species in nutrient removal performance were not large.
      • It is relatively easy to reduce P in leachate, while nitrogen is more difficult.
      • Organic matter addition to biofiltration soils is not recommended.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0047
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:207-214
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    • S. J. Livesley, A. Ossola, C. G. Threlfall, A. K. Hahs and N. S. G. Williams
      Soil Carbon and Carbon/Nitrogen Ratio Change under Tree Canopy, Tall Grass, and Turf Grass Areas of Urban Green Space
      Core Ideas
      • We sampled soil under tree canopy, tall grass, and short grass in 13 urban greenspaces.
      • Tree canopy soil had significantly greater soil C density and C/N ratios.
      • Soil C/N ratios increased significantly with increasing green space age.
      • Soil C and C/N were best modeled by tree basal area and understory vegetation.
      • Tree canopy areas can be managed to buffer nitrogen eutrophication.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.03.0121
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:215-223
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    • Carlo Calfapietra, Arianna Morani, Gregorio Sgrigna, Sara Di Giovanni, Valerio Muzzini, Emanuele Pallozzi, Gabriele Guidolotti, David Nowak and Silvano Fares
      Removal of Ozone by Urban and Peri-Urban Forests: Evidence from Laboratory, Field, and Modeling Approaches
      Core Ideas
      • Urban and peri-urban forests can contribute to O3 removal in cities.
      • Combining different experimental approaches allows us to improve estimates of O3 fluxes.
      • Choice of the right species and its physiological status can maximize O3 removal by vegetation.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0061
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:224-233
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Kristina A. Dunn-Johnston, Jürgen Kreuzwieser, Satoshi Hirabayashi, Lyndal Plant, Heinz Rennenberg and Susanne Schmidt
      Isoprene Emission Factors for Subtropical Street Trees for Regional Air Quality Modeling
      Core Ideas
      • Isoprene emissions quantified for three urban Australian subtropical tree species.
      • Modeling measured, rather than generic, emission rates reduced emissions by 97%.
      • Xanthostemon and Buckinghamia species have low isoprene emission rates.
      • Isoprene was not detected in Harpullia; possibly a good species for the subtropics.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.01.0051
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:234-243
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Paloma Cariñanos, Cristiano Adinolfi, Consuelo Díaz de la Guardia, Concepción De Linares and Manuel Casares-Porcel
      Characterization of Allergen Emission Sources in Urban Areas
      Core Ideas
      • Pollen emissions by urban flora are the chief source of airborne allergens.
      • A novel characterization of the potential allergenicity of urban trees is presented.
      • Wind-pollinated species are associated with higher allergenicity values.
      • Assigning an allergenic value to each tree species will help to improve air quality.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0075
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:244-252
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Changhyoun Park and Gunnar W. Schade
      Anthropogenic and Biogenic Features of Long-Term Measured CO 2 Flux in North Downtown Houston, Texas
      Core Ideas
      • Multiyear flux measurements of CO2 north of downtown Houston, TX.
      • Dominant drivers of net CO2 fluxes are local traffic, deciduous tree foliage, and human respiration.
      • Directionally higher CO2 fluxes due to industrial emissions.
      • Local vegetation reduces summer daytime net CO2 fluxes, increases summer nighttime respiration.
      • Drop in regional CO2 abundances after Hurricane Ike may be related to large economic changes.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0115
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:253-265
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
  • ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTANTS AND TRACE GASES up

    • Jenifer L. Wightman and Peter B. Woodbury
      New York Dairy Manure Management Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Costs (1992–2022)
      Core Ideas
      • Increased anaerobic storage of manure has doubled GHG emissions from manure management.
      • Methane accounts for >80% of emissions from manure management.
      • Based on three trials, separated liquid manure storage was estimated to have a MCF of 0.61.
      • Capture and flare of CH4 is estimated at $0.005 per liter of milk.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.06.0269
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:266-275
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
  • ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION up

    • B. Emile Bolou-Bi, Etienne Dambrine, Nicolas Angeli, Benoît Pollier, Claude Nys, François Guerold and Arnaud Legout
      Magnesium Isotope Variations to Trace Liming Input to Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Case Study in the Vosges Mountains
      Core Ideas
      • Ten years ago, dolomite lime was applied to a forested catchment on granite.
      • Liming induced an increase of Mg content in tree leaves, soil pools, and stream water.
      • Liming induced a decrease of δ26 Mg in the ecosystem compartments (soil, tree, stream).
      • Monitoring of Mg isotope variations appears to be an efficient tracer of dolomite inputs.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0096
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:276-284
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  • LANDSCAPE AND WATERSHED PROCESSES up

    • Casey D. Kennedy, Peter J. A. Kleinman and Carolyn J. DeMoranville
      Spatial Scale and Field Management Affect Patterns of Phosphorus Loss in Cranberry Floodwaters
      Core Ideas
      • Relatively high P loss was associated with the harvest flood rather than the winter flood.
      • Recently renovated farms exhibited lower values of P export in floodwater.
      • Soil porewater that was high in P was discharged later in the flood release.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2014.11.0485
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:285-293
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    • Eric O. Young and Donald S. Ross
      Total and Labile Phosphorus Concentrations as Influenced by Riparian Buffer Soil Properties
      Core Ideas
      • Riparian P loss models use soil P as an input, but extant data are rare.
      • Total and labile P varied significantly among soil series mapped in the buffer.
      • Soil organic matter predicted the amount of total labile and organic P.
      • Results indicate improved soil maps could be used to index soil P at the sites studied.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.07.0345
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:294-304
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  • ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ENVIRONMENT up

    • Godswill O. Tesi, Chukwujindu M.A. Iwegbue, Fidelis N. Emuh and Godwin E. Nwajei
      Lagdo Dam Flood Disaster of 2012: An Assessment of the Concentrations, Sources, and Risks of PAHs in Floodplain Soils of the Lower Reaches of River Niger, Nigeria
      Core Ideas
      • Fossil fuel, wood combustion, and traffic emissions are the major source of PAHs in these soils.
      • Higher molecular weight PAHs are the dominant compounds in these soils.
      • Considerable cancer risk for children and adults exposed to these soils.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.02.0116
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:305-314
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • N. L. Fahrenfeld, N. Del Monaco, J. T. Coates and A. W. Elzerman
      Fecal Sterol and Runoff Analysis for Nonpoint Source Tracking
      Core Ideas
      • Fecal sterols indicate nonpoint-source human fecal contamination in watershed.
      • Different sterol ratios applied for identification of human fecal pollution vary in sensitivity.
      • No correlation observed between urban runoff and human fecal sterol signatures.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.06.0312
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:315-322
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
    • Graciela Palma, Milko Jorquera, Rolando Demanet, Sebastian Elgueta, Gabriela Briceño and María de la Luz Mora
      Urea Fertilizer and pH Influence on Sorption Process of Flumetsulam and MCPA Acidic Herbicides in a Volcanic Soil
      Core Ideas
      • The effect of urea on adsorption depended on the acidic character of the herbicides.
      • An increase in pH and dissolved organic C due to urea application was observed.
      • The sorbed amount of MCPA was higher than that of flumetsulam.
      • Urea application could increase the leaching of acid herbicides in Andisols.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.07.0358
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:323-330
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    • Cui-Ying Liu, Barbara J. Cade-Menun, Xiang-Hua Xu and Jian-Ling Fan
      Electron Donor Substances and Iron Oxides Stimulate Anaerobic Dechlorination of DDT in a Slurry System with Hydragric Acrisols
      Core Ideas
      • Hydragric Acrisols with iron oxide have a great potential for DDT degradation.
      • Propionic acid was a proper electron donor substance for DDT dechlorination.
      • Combined application of VFAs and Fe(III) was efficient for DDT dechlorination.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.07.0406
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:331-340
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  • SURFACE WATER QUALITY up

    • Mark B. David, Corey A. Mitchell, Lowell E. Gentry and Ronald K. Salemme
      Chloride Sources and Losses in Two Tile-Drained Agricultural Watersheds
      Core Ideas
      • Chloride inputs in agricultural tile-drained watershed respond quickly to inputs.
      • Chloride inputs from potash could be used to predict riverine concentrations.
      • Chloride results suggest that nitrate response would also be rapid in these watersheds.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.06.0302
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:341-348
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
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  • VADOSE ZONE PROCESSES AND CHEMICAL TRANSPORT up

    • Kristin A. Fisher, John J. Meisinger and Bruce R. James
      Urea Hydrolysis Rate in Soil Toposequences as Influenced by pH, Carbon, Nitrogen, and Soluble Metals
      Core Ideas
      • On average, urea hydrolysis was eight times faster in A horizons than in B horizons.
      • In the Coastal Plain, riparian soil hydrolyzed urea faster than agricultural soil.
      • An increase in pH increased urea hydrolysis in A-horizon soils more than in B-horizon soils.
      • Soil organic matter factors predicted urea hydrolysis in native and pH-adjusted soils.
      • Urea transformation data in toposequences will enhance urea-transport research.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.05.0228
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:349-359
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  • WASTE MANAGEMENT up

    • Dharini Paramashivam, Timothy J. Clough, Nicholas M. Dickinson, Jacqui Horswell, Obed Lense, Lynne Clucas and Brett H. Robinson
      Effect of Pine Waste and Pine Biochar on Nitrogen Mobility in Biosolids
      Core Ideas
      • Dry sawdust reduced nitrate leaching from biosolids; moist sawdust was less effective.
      • Biochar was ineffective in reducing nitrate leaching from aged biosolids.
      • Biochar chemically sorbed significant amounts of ammonium, whereas sawdust did not.
      • Neither biochar nor sawdust chemically sorbed nitrate.
      • Sawdust physically sorbed both ammonium and nitrate.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.06.0298
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:360-367
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
  • WETLANDS AND AQUATIC PROCESSES up

    • Rebecca L. Phillips, Cari Ficken, Mikki Eken, John Hendrickson and Ofer Beeri
      Wetland Soil Carbon in a Watershed Context for the Prairie Pothole Region
      Core Ideas
      • Wetland soil carbon varies with upland land use but not landscape position.
      • Carbon mineralization rates vary with landscape position.
      • Soil removal for wetland restoration may affect plant re-establishment.
      doi:10.2134/jeq2015.06.0310
      Journal of Environmental Quality 2016 45:368-375
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      [ Supplement 1 ]
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