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This article in SSSAJ

  1. Vol. 22 No. 1, p. 43-48
     
    Received: Aug 31, 1956
    Accepted: Sept 12, 1957


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doi:10.2136/sssaj1958.03615995002200010013x

Proportionate Uptake of Soil and Fertilizer Phosphorus by Plants as Affected by Nitrogen Fertilization: I. Growth Chamber Experiment1

  1. D. L. Grunes,
  2. F. G. Viets and
  3. S. H. Shih2,3

Abstract

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of source and placement of nitrogen on the relative availability of fertilizer and soil phosphorus to plants. Barley was grown on seven soils in a controlled light-temperature chamber. The addition of nitrogen fertilizer generally increased the percent of the total phosphorus absorbed by plants from bands of concentrated superphosphate. The addition of ammonium sulfate with the phosphorus band was generally more effective in increasing the percent of the total plant phosphorus derived from the fertilizer than was separating the nitrogen and phosphorus bands. Placement of sodium nitrate with, or on the opposite side of the plants from, the phosphorus band were approximately equally effective methods for increasing the percent of the total plant phosphorus absorbed from the fertilizer.

Indications are that the effect of nitrogen, on increasing the relative uptake of banded fertilizer phosphorus, was associated with increased top and root growth, and also with decrease in soil pH.

Detailed studies on one soil indicate that, when the phosphorus fertilizer was thoroughly mixed with the soil, the addition of nitrogen fertilizers did not increase the percent of the total phosphorus absorbed by plants from the fertilizer.

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