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Abstract

 

This article in SSSAJ

  1. Vol. 22 No. 6, p. 539-542
     
    Received: Feb 10, 1958
    Accepted: Apr 28, 1958


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doi:10.2136/sssaj1958.03615995002200060017x

Quantitative Evaluation of Soil Reaction and Base Status Changes Resulting from Field Application of Residually Acid-Forming Nitrogen Fertilizers1

  1. Fernando Abruna,
  2. Robert W. Pearson and
  3. Charles B. Elkins2

Abstract

Abstract

An evaluation was made of the changes in soil reaction and exchangeable base content of two Red-Yellow Podzolic soils and one alluvial soil resulting from high rates of application of ammonium nitrate and of ammonium sulfate.

Severe reductions in exchangeable base level and lowering of soil pH occurred within a year after beginning N applications. The undesirable effects occurred deep in the soil profile where corrections would be difficult, if not impossible, from a practical standpoint. Exchangeable K was lost from the soil faster than other bases at the higher rates of N. No indication of a subsoil zone of accumulation of bases leached out of upper horizons was observed. The measured losses of exchangeable bases were appreciably lower than calculated CaCO3 equivalents of the residual acidity of the fertilizer except for the higher N rates on the Toa clay loam.

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