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This article in SSSAJ

  1. Vol. 43 No. 3, p. 570-574
     
    Received: Aug 23, 1978
    Accepted: Dec 18, 1978


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doi:10.2136/sssaj1979.03615995004300030027x

Growth, Water Relations, and Yield of Wheat Planted in Four Row Directions1

  1. P. I. Erickson,
  2. M. B. Kirkham and
  3. J. F. Stone2

Abstract

Abstract

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell. ‘Osage’) was planted in north-south, northwest-southeast, east-west, and southwest-northeast directions, using a wheel layout, to determine the effect of row orientation on height, leaf water potential, stomatal resistance, and yield of winter wheat exposed to the normally strong north and south winds of central Oklahoma.

Before plants started to grow rapidly in the spring, wheat in north-south rows was about 1 cm taller than wheat in the other row directions. After plants started to grow rapidly, wheat in north-south rows was 2- to 6-cm taller than wheat in the other rows. Leaf water potentials of wheat oriented in north-south rows were, on an average throughout the spring of the experiment, 2.8, 2.9, and 2.1 bars higher (less negative) than potentials of leaves oriented in other rows for 1000-, 1300-, and 1600-hour readings, respectively. Stomatal resistances of leaves of wheat oriented in north-south rows were, on an average throughout the spring of the experiment, 0.2, 0.7, and 0.2 sec/cm lower than those of leaves oriented in other row directions for the 1000-, 1300-, and 1600-hour readings, respectively. The east-west plantings had about a 10% higher yield than the north-south rows.

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