About Us | Help Videos | Contact Us | Subscriptions
 

Members of ASA, CSSA, and SSSA: Due to system upgrades, your subscriptions in the digital library will be unavailable from May 15th to May 22nd. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, and thank you for your patience. If you have any questions, please call our membership department at 608-273-8080.

 

Institutional Subscribers: Institutional subscription access will not be interrupted for existing subscribers who have access via IP authentication, though new subscriptions or changes will not be available during the upgrade period. For questions, please email us at: queries@dl.sciencesocieties.org or call Danielle Lynch: 608-268-4976.

Abstract

 

This article in SSSAJ

  1. Vol. 48 No. 2, p. 295-297
     
    Received: June 15, 1983
    Accepted: Oct 17, 1983


 View
 Download
 Alerts
 Permissions
Request Permissions
 Share

doi:10.2136/sssaj1984.03615995004800020013x

Short-Term Immobilization of Fertilizer Nitrogen at the Surface of No-Till and Plowed Soils1

  1. Charles W. Rice and
  2. M. Scott Smith2

Abstract

Abstract

Immobilization of (NH4)2SO4 in no-till and conventionally tilled soils was monitored after application of 15N enriched material to the surface of 20-cm diameter plots on three soil types. Soils were collected periodically up to 35 d and 15N in organic and inorganic fractions was measured. On all three soils there was more immobilization in no-till. After 35 d, the percentage of fertilizer applied that was immobilized was 21 and 11 on Maury silt loam, 13 and 6 on Tilsit silt loam, and 24 and 15 on Cavode silt loam for no-till and conventional tillage, respectively. There were no consistent trends or statistically significant differences between tillage treatments with regard to total N recovery (organic plus inorganic). The increased potential for immobilization of N at the surface of no-till soils may significantly reduce crop recovery of fertilizer N.

  Please view the pdf by using the Full Text (PDF) link under 'View' to the left.

Copyright © . Soil Science Society of America