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This article in SSSAJ

  1. Vol. 52 No. 4, p. 985-993
     
    Received: Sept 28, 1987


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doi:10.2136/sssaj1988.03615995005200040016x

Complexation and Catalyzed Oxidative Polymerization of Catechol by Aluminum in Acidic Solution

  1. M. B. McBride ,
  2. F. J. Sikora and
  3. L. G. Wesselink
  1. Dep. of Agronomy, Bradfield and Emerson Halls, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY 14853
    F137 NFDC, TVA, Muscle Shoals, AL 35660
    Dijkgraaf 4-14A, 6708 PG Wageningen, The Netherlands

Abstract

Abstract

The role of soluble Al in catalyzing the abiotic oxidation of phenolic compounds has been investigated by monitoring the slow oxidation of aerated aqueous solutions of catechol containing Al. Spectroscopic analysis of the various oxidation products has demonstrated that aqueous Al3+ increases the rate of oxidation of catechol by O2, favoring the formation of highly colored polymeric products which may possess charge-transfer properties. Spectral (UV-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and electron spin resonance) properties of these products suggest that they have some similarities to polymers generated by alkaline oxidation of polyphenols, but they also have properties which suggest that they are related to melanins generated enzymatically byu fungi and plants. A proposed low-pH mechanism for the role of Al in promoting oxidative polymerization is based on the concept that Al3+ cations tend to stabilize o-semiquinone radicals at low pH and direct the manner in which these radicals polymerize. Aluminum may also stabilize charge-transfer complexes by bridging oxidized and reduced molecules. Preliminary evidence is presented to suggest that the surfaces of Al oxides in soils may, by a similar mechanism, catalyze the oxidation of phenolic compounds by O2.

Contribution from the Dep. of Agronomy, Cornell Univ.

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