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This article in SSSAJ

  1. Vol. 60 No. 4, p. 1140-1144
     
    Received: June 20, 1995


    * Corresponding author(s): deanagri@agri.huji.ac.il
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doi:10.2136/sssaj1996.03615995006000040026x

Stability Constants of the Fungal Siderophore Rhizoferrin with Various Microelements and Calcium

  1. M. Shenker,
  2. Y. Chen  and
  3. Y. Hadar
  1. Dep. of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot, Israel
    Dep. of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot, Israel

Abstract

Abstract

Stability constants of metal-ligand complexes determine their speciation in solution at equilibrium. Therefore, stability constants of siderophore-metal complexes are of crucial importance in studies of their efficiency as Fe mediators. In this study, potentiometric titrations were used to determine protonation and stability constants of Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Ca2+, and Zn2+ with rhizoferrin, a siderophore produced by Rhizopus arrhizus, which has been shown in previous studies to be an effective carrier of Fe to plants. Rhizoferrin was found to be a specific Fe3+ chelator but with a stability constant lower than most microbial siderophores. The ferric complex of rhizoferrin is anionic throughout the pH range prevailing in soils, and therefore, it is expected to be mobile in the rhizosphere. The following log Kapp values at 25°C, pH 7.0, and 0.1 M ionic strength were determined: 19.1, 7.5, 6.2, 6.0, and 4.4 for Fe3+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Ca2+, and Zn2+, respectively. The apparent stability constant (Kapp) value for the ferric complex of rhizoferrin suggests that ligand exchange with mugineic acid is the mechanism facilitating the efficiency of rhizoferrin as an Fe carrier to graminaceous plants.

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