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Soil Science Society of America Journal Abstract - PEDOLOGY

Continental United States Atmospheric Wet Calcium Deposition and Soil Inorganic Carbon Stocks

 

This article in SSSAJ

  1. Vol. 73 No. 3, p. 989-994
     
    Received: Jan 9, 2008


    * Corresponding author(s): john.galbraith@vt.edu
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doi:10.2136/sssaj2008.0004
  1. Megan A. Goddarda,
  2. Elena A. Mikhailovaa,
  3. Christopher J. Posta,
  4. Mark A. Schlautmanb and
  5. John M. Galbraith *c
  1. a Dep. of Forestry and Natural Resources, Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC 29634-0359
    b Dep. of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson Univ., Anderson, SC 29625-6510
    c Dep. of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0404

Abstract

Organic and inorganic soil C pools are major components of the global C budget, yet they are still poorly estimated and understood. This study ranked atmospheric wet Ca2+ deposition from 1994 to 2003 within the continental United States by soil order using spatial analysis of Ca2+ wet deposition data and a state soil geographic database. The total average annual atmospheric wet deposition (AAAWD) of Ca2+ within the continental United States was 8.6 × 108 kg, which would be equivalent to the theoretical formation of 2.6 × 108 kg C as soil inorganic C (SIC), barring losses from erosion and deep leaching. The soil orders receiving the highest area-normalized total AAAWD of Ca2+ were: (i) Alfisols (172 kg km−2 Ca2+), (ii) Mollisols (170 kg km−2 Ca2+), (iii) Histosols (168 kg km−2 Ca2+), and (iv) Vertisols (157 kg km−2 Ca2+). Barring losses from erosion and leaching, these Ca2+ wet deposition fluxes would equate to the theoretical formation of the following amounts of area-normalized total C equivalents in the pedon: (i) Alfisols, 52 kg C km−2; (ii) Mollisols, 51 kg C km−2; (iii) Histosols, 50 kg C km−2; and (iv) Vertisols, 47 kg C km−2 The sequestration of SIC has been shown to be important in soil orders of nonarid regions, particularly in Mollisols and Alfisols.

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