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This article in SSSAJ

  1. Vol. 77 No. 3, p. 890-902
     
    Received: Dec 17, 2012
    Published: April 30, 2013


    * Corresponding author(s): brendan.malone@sydney.edu.au
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doi:10.2136/sssaj2012.0419

Spatial Scaling for Digital Soil Mapping

  1. Brendan P. Malone *a,
  2. Alex B. McBratneyb and
  3. Budiman Minasnyc
  1. a Faculty of Agriculture and Environment The University of Sydney Room 115 Biomedical Building Australia Technology Park Eveleigh, NSW 2015, Australia
    b Faculty of Agriculture and Environment The University of Sydney Room 105 Biomedical Building Australia Technology Park Eveleigh, NSW 2015, Australia
    c Faculty of Agriculture and Environment The University of Sydney Room 108 Biomedical Building Australia Technology Park Eveleigh, NSW 2015, Australia

Abstract

We describe in this paper, a broad overview of spatial scale concepts and scaling procedures that are specifically relevant for digital soil mapping (DSM). Despite the recent growth and operational status of DSM, one existing and foreseeably growing issue for users of digital soil information is the inequality of spatial scales between what is required and what is actually available to adequately address soil-related questions posed from within and from outside the soil science community. In the absence of conducting new soil survey or not being able to acquire the original legacy soil information (soil point data) as a means of creating user-specified soil information products, spatial scaling provides a useful solution. Spatial scaling for DSM involves changes in map extent, grid-cell resolution, and prediction support. We review in this paper the different forms of spatial scaling, which are described in terms of changes to grid spacing and prediction support. Fine-gridding and coarse-gridding are operations where the grid spacing changes but support remains unchanged. Deconvolution and convolution are operations where the support always changes which may or may not involve changing the grid spacing. While disseveration and conflation operations occur when the support and grid size are equal and both are then changed equally and simultaneously. Some possible and existing pedometric methods are described for implementation of each scaling process, as is an extended example for performing convolution where the support changes yet the resolution remains the same.

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Copyright © 2013. Copyright © by the Soil Science Society of America, Inc.