Figure 1.
Figure 1.

Status of the tomato euchromatin sequence as of September 2008. For each chromosome the responsible country is shown. Progress in the sequencing of each chromosome (Chr) is given, as well as the status and the availability of the bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). HTGS, high-throughput genome sequence.

 


Figure 2.
Figure 2.

Labeling of the heterochromatic part of tomato chromosome 6 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with the Cot-100 genomic DNA fraction (green signal). The differently labeled bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones resident in the heterochromatin–euchromatin borders of the short arm and of the long arm are pseudocolored in red and magenta. DAPI, 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dihydrochloride.

 


Figure 3.
Figure 3.

Annotation categories for the annotated tomato genes from the International Tomato Annotation Group annotation pipeline and comparison to categories in Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice. (A) Annotation statistics categorized by higher-level gene ontology (GO) biological process terms. (B) Annotation statistics categorized by GO molecular function terms.

 


Figure 4.
Figure 4.

Gene and repeat coverage for selected tomato chromosomes (4, 5, 6, 9, and 12). The bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are arranged in the order they appear along the chromosome. For each BAC, the percentage of expressed sequence tag (blue bars) and repeat (red bars) coverage are shown. The gray rectangle defines the pericentromeric heterochromatic region in each chromosome. The data shown in this figure are available for all the chromosomes under sequencing and are available through the “Genome Overview” at http://biosrv.cab.unina.it/GBrowse/ (verified 16 Jan. 2009). The data are updated at each new BAC release in GenBank. Updated versions of this figure are provided on unordered BACs and are available at http://biosrv.cab.unina.it/GBrowse/Graphs/graphall1.html (verified 16 Jan. 2009).

 


Figure 5.
Figure 5.

Different categories of disease-resistance-like genes in the tomato unigene set. These genes can be grouped into three major classes (NBS-LRR type, LZ-NBS-LRR type, or LRR-Tm type) on the basis of their encoded protein motifs such as leucine zippers (LZ), nucleotide binding sites (NBS), leucine-rich repeats (LRR), and trans-membrane (Tm) domains.